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A Centennial Commentary Upon the Early Days of Squamish, British Columbia

A booklet on Squamish history, with photos, stories, maps and more. It was created as a part of British Columbia centennial celebrations that carried across the province in 1958. According to the booklet, 1888 was the beginning of real settlement that led to the formation of the town of Squamish.

Click the picture above to see the whole book. Please note that it may take quite some time to load.

Squamish Centennial Committee

At Stardust Hop Yards

Left to right: Charlie Douglas (Xwa-lacktun), Ernie Harry (Pekultn Siyam), and George Harry (Xwach-la-nexw) at Stardust Hop Yards.

Charlie Douglas is Ernie Harry's grandfather.

Hop farming was Squamish's first major industry. The major producer was Squamish Valley Hop Raising Co. (Bell-Irving Ranch). Hops are perennials and grown about 6 feet apart. They are picked during September and August. Hops are dried and bleached with sulphur in a kiln. In Squamish, Chinese labour was brought in to tend the hops. Local First Nations were the pickers. They would camp in the area now between Petro Canada gas station and the Cottonwood condominiums. The hops in Squamish were top grade. They were shipped to Vancouver in bales wrapped in Burlap, then shipped to Britain where they were used to make beer.

Austin Harry at Sardis Hop Yards

Austin Harry (XwaXwalkn) at Sardis Hop Yards. Hop farming was Squamish's first major industry. The major producer was Squamish Valley Hop Raising Co. (Bell-Irving Ranch). Hops are perennials and grown about 6 feet apart. They are picked during September and August. Hops are dried and bleached with sulphur in a kiln. In Squamish, Chinese labour was brought in to tend the hops. Local First Nations were the pickers. They would camp in the area now between Petro Canada gas station and the Cottonwood condominiums. The hops in Squamish were top grade. They were shipped to Vancouver in bales wrapped in Burlap, then shipped to Britain where they were used to make beer.

Austin Harry on saw

B.P.O.E. Lodge (Hudson House) in background.

Austin Harry (Peḵultn Siyam), of Squamish Nation, lived in Sta-a-mis in the early 1900's.

38033 Second Avenue
Hudson House was originally built in the 1930's as a local community hall (PGE Hall). Built by railway and community volunteers, the PGE Hall was once the site of basketball games, dances, and other gala community events. It later became the Hudson House, and then an empty lot.

Original Use: Community Hall.
1993 use: Rooming House (Hudson House).
1993 condition: Retained original form without significant alteration. Location among newer buildings left the Hall looking somewhat run down.

First Nations

Left to right, back row: Harriet Harry (Tsawaysia), George Harry (Xwach-la-nexw).
Front: Ernest Harry (Pekultn Siyam), Charlie Douglas (Xwa-lacktun), Catherine Douglas.

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