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At a hop ranch

Herbert Lawson Rae next to horse; Robert Stewart (Bert) Rae on horseback.

Hop farming was Squamish's first major industry. The major producer was Squamish Valley Hop Raising Co. (Bell-Irving Ranch). Hops are perennials and grown about 6 feet apart. They are picked during September and August. Hops are dried and bleached with sulphur in a kiln. In Squamish, Chinese labour was brought in to tend the hops. Local First Nations picked them. They would camp in the area now between Petro Canada gas station and the Cottonwood condominiums. The hops in Squamish were top grade. They were shipped to Vancouver in bales wrapped in Burlap, then shipped to Britain where they were used to make beer.

Wilfred Rae behind Huey Mills home or hop farm

Wilfred (Whiff) Rae behind Huey Mills home or hop farm.

Hop farming was Squamish's first major industry. The major producer was Squamish Valley Hop Raising Co. (Bell-Irving Ranch). Hops are perennials and grown about 6 feet apart. They are picked during September and August. Hops are dried and bleached with sulphur in a kiln. In Squamish, Chinese labour was brought in to tend the hops. Local First Nations picked them. They would camp in the area now between Petro Canada gas station and the Cottonwood condominiums. The hops in Squamish were top grade. They were shipped to Vancouver in bales wrapped in Burlap, then shipped to Britain where they were used to make beer.

Wilfred Rae on Squamish Valley Hop Farm

Hop farming was Squamish's first major industry. The major producer was Squamish Valley Hop Raising Co. (Bell-Irving Ranch). Hops are perennials and grown about 6 feet apart. They are picked during September and August. Hops are dried and bleached with sulphur in a kiln. In Squamish, Chinese labour was brought in to tend the hops. The hops were picked by local First Nations. They would camp in the area now between Petro Canada gas station and the Cottonwood condominiums. The hops in Squamish were top grade. They were shipped to Vancouver in bales wrapped in Burlap, then shipped to Britain where they were used to make beer.

Timeline
1890 - Hops first grown by E.B. Madill.
1891, February - Group from Puyallup Valley (near Tacoma) examined Squamish as potential hop growing area. The Squamish Valley Hop Raising Company was formed by Vancouver businessmen. Dr Bell-Irving (great uncle of previous Lieutenant Governor) was owner of the company. President was William Shannon and Secretary was T.T. Black; and Directors: Dr Bell-Irving, W.E. Green, George Magee, E.L. Phillips.
1892 - The Squamish Valley Hop Raising Company leased land from E.B. Madill. 1.5 acres of hop vine nursery stock was planted. In addition, 260 acres were purchased, 20 acres of which were cleared. Ranch was in the present location of Eagle Run extending from Heidenriech's house to Judd Road to Horse Creek. Frank H. Potter, a hop rancher from Puyallup, became a manager. No hops grown but frame house and out-buildings built for Potter.
1893, Fall - 5 acres hops grown on Madill's leased property. No hops grown on Squamish Valley Hop Company's own land. 40 acres cleared but planted potatoes, oats, and hat. W. Shannon still president of the company. Chas. McLaughlin, secretary.
1894 - Fred Clayton Thorne replaced Frank Potter as manager of Squamish Valley Hop Company. Hop industry began to thrive. Allen Rae, E.B. Madill, George Magee, and Tom Reid grew hops.
1897 - D.H. Tweedie was manager of Madill's hop ranch.
1898 - Charles Rose was manager of Squamish Valley Hop Company (Bell-Irving ranch). Wife, Alice, was ranch cook.
1906, March - 28 acres of hops planted at Bell-Irving ranch.
1914 - With beginning if war, hop prices fell. Hop ranches were shut down. The Squamish Valley Hop Company was owned by Dr Bell Irving and Mr Murry (manager of Bank of Commerce in Vancouver) owned ranch at that time. Fred Thorne took over Squamish Valley Hope Company ranch and started raising short horn cattle.
1917 - Hop industry had died in Squamish.
~1931 - George Carson was running his brother Robert (Bob) Carson's hop ranch when it burned down.
1944 - Roderick Mackenzie owned old Squamish Hop Co. ranch. Referred to as the mackenzie Ranch or the Pig or Hog Ranch. Since he produced hops for export to help the war effort, it received those names.

Chinese Hut at Bell Irving Hop Farm

Left to right: Marlo Sandhoff, Jimmie Rae, Robert Stewart (Bert) Rae.

Hop farming was Squamish's first major industry. The major producer was Squamish Valley Hop Raising Co. (Bell-Irving Ranch). Hops are perennials and grown about 6 feet apart. They are picked during September and August. Hops are dried and bleached with sulphur in a kiln. In Squamish, Chinese labour was brought in to tend the hops, and they were picked by local First Nations. They would camp in the area now between Petro Canada gas station and the Cottonwood condominiums. The hops in Squamish were top grade. They were shipped to Vancouver in bales wrapped in Burlap, then shipped to Britain where they were used to make beer.

Timeline
1890 - Hops first grown by E.B. Madill.
1891, February - Group from Puyallup Valley (near Tacoma) examined Squamish as potential hop growing area. The Squamish Valley Hop Raising Company was formed by Vancouver businessmen. Dr Bell-Irving (great uncle of previous Lieutenant Governor) was owner of the company. President was William Shannon and Secretary was T.T. Black; and Directors: Dr Bell-Irving, W.E. Green, George Magee, E.L. Phillips.
1892 - The Squamish Valley Hop Raising Company leased land from E.B. Madill. 1.5 acres of hop vine nursery stock was planted. In addition, 260 acres were purchased, 20 acres of which were cleared. Ranch was in the present location of Eagle Run extending from Heidenriech's house to Judd Road to Horse Creek. Frank H. Potter, a hop rancher from Puyallup, became a manager. No hops grown but frame house and out-buildings built for Potter.
1893, Fall - 5 acres hops grown on Madill's leased property. No hops grown on Squamish Valley Hop Company's own land. 40 acres cleared but planted potatoes, oats, and hat. W. Shannon still president of the company. Chas. McLaughlin, secretary.
1894 - Fred Clayton Thorne replaced Frank Potter as manager of Squamish Valley Hop Company. Hop industry began to thrive. Allen Rae, E.B. Madill, George Magee, and Tom Reid grew hops.
1897 - D.H. Tweedie was manager of Madill's hop ranch.
1898 - Charles Rose was manager of Squamish Valley Hop Company (Bell-Irving ranch). Wife, Alice, was ranch cook.
1906, March - 28 acres of hops planted at Bell-Irving ranch.
1914 - With beginning if war, hop prices fell. Hop ranches were shut down. The Squamish Valley Hop Company was owned by Dr Bell Irving and Mr Murry (manager of Bank of Commerce in Vancouver) owned ranch at that time. Fred Thorne took over Squamish Valley Hope Company ranch and started raising short horn cattle.
1917 - Hop industry had died in Squamish.
~1931 - George Carson was running his brother Robert (Bob) Carson's hop ranch when it burned down.
1944 - Roderick Mackenzie owned old Squamish Hop Co. ranch. Referred to as the mackenzie Ranch or the Pig or Hog Ranch. Since he produced hops for export to help the war effort, it received those names.

Schoonovers at Hop Farm

Left to right: Unknown, Mary, Mildred, Robert, Elvira Schoonover (nee Bump) at Hope Farm.

Hop farming was Squamish's first major industry. The major producer was Squamish Valley Hop Raising Co. (Bell-Irving Ranch). Hops are perennials and grown about 6 feet apart. They are picked during September and August. Hops are dried and bleached with sulphur in a kiln. In Squamish, Chinese labour was brought in to tend the hops. The hops were picked by First Nations workers. They would camp in the area now between Petro Canada gas station and the Cottonwood condominiums. The hops in Squamish were top grade. They were shipped to Vancouver in bales wrapped in Burlap, then shipped to Britain where they were used to make beer.

Logging camp

Logging camp owned and operated by Allan and Charles Barbour - about 1907.

Research compiled by Eric Andersen, 2011: This photo, apparently taken by one of the Magee brothers, shows the construction phase of the flume project. The location is at the west side of the Squamish Timber Company camp, just above the bank of the Brohm River, which is to the left from this scene. It is difficult to tell from the photograph whether the water for the flume is being led from the Brohm River (in the back and to the left of of the photo) or the Cheekye River (around to the right). Either is possible. The Squamish Timber Co. camp and the beginning of the flume lies between the Brohm River and the Cheekye River. Water for the flume might be more easily taken from the Brohm which is closer, however the Cheekye has a steeper gradient. The larger the logs to be flumed, and the steeper the grade, the more water is required.
The log flume was probably used for transporting long cedar shingle bolts, in standard 16-18 foot lengths. These would be boomed in the river, perhaps in the Jimmy Jimmy Slough (Judd Slough), and then delivered elsewhere for manufacturing into roofing shingles.

Huey Mills and Kate Mills

Huey Mills and Kate Mills (formerly Mrs Allan Rae) sitting in the background. Man in the foreground is unknown.

Research compiled by Eric Anderson, 2011: This photo, apparently taken by one of the Magee brothers, shows the construction phase of the flume project. The occassion is a visit to the site by Hughie Mills' new bride Catherine, the former Mrs Allen Rae, in the Spring of 1910. In this photo, Hughie Mills appears to be giving his wife a tour of the project. Mills was a building contractor in the valley, and very likely worked on the flume construction. The location is at the west side of the Squamish Timber Company camp, just above the bank of the Brohm River, which is to the left from this scene. It is difficult to tell from the photograph whether the water for the flume is being led from the Brohm River (in the back and to the left of of the photo) or the Cheekye River (around to the right). Either is possible. The Squamish Timber Co. camp and the beginning of the flume lies between the Brohm River and the Cheekye River. Water for the flume might be more easily taken from the Brohm( closer), but the Cheekye has the steeper gradient. The larger the logs to be flumed, and the steeper the grade, the more water is required.

Clifford Thorne and Lottie Fulk on horseback

Research compiled by Eric Andersen: Logging manager's daughter Lottie Fulk on hourseback riding with Cliffe Thorne, son of Squamish Valley Hop Raising Co. manager Fred Thorne, ca 1907. Lottie Fulk's father was Owen Fulk of Skagit County (WA) who was hired by the manager of E.K. Wood Lumber Co. to supervise Squamish River logging operations. During the five years Fulk was in Squamish, he was the valley's preeminent man of business.

Ella Clemeny, Minerva Rae, Ella Fulk

Left to right: Ella Clemeny (teacher), Minerva Rae, Ella Fulk

Research compiled by Eric Andersen: Schoolteacher Ella Clements, Minnie Rae, and Mrs Lola Fulk, 1907. Minnie Rae's 1907 diary refers to the Fulks, the upper valley camps, and Owen Fulk's business trips into town by steamship. Owen Fulk of Skagit County (WA) was hired by E.K. Wood Lumber Co. to supervise the Squamish River logging operations. During the five years or so Fulk was at Squamish, he was the valley's preeminent man of business.

Brackendale & Cheakamus stage

Brackendale & Cheakamus stage in 1910 (or 1908?), driven by Henry Judd. Judd started with oxen in 1903 and later changed to horses. This pictured incarnation of the stage was known as the "Rapid". In 1912, it was supplemented by a new Garford motor truck. Harry Judd provided transportation services between Squamish Dock and the Cheakamus Lodge at Cheekye -the beginning of the Pemberton Trail.

Squamish Review: Tuesday, March 15, 1949

[MAP]

BOARD OF TRADE HOLDS BUSY MEETING

TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC TO VISIT SQUAMISH

[MAP]

MACKENZIE'S LTD. TO EXPAND HERE

ROUND OF PARTIES FOR YOUNG FRY

CREDIT UNION HOLDS ANNUAL MEETING

RED LETTER DAY FOR SQUAMISH

AT LEAST THE STORK DERBY IS OVER

WILL LEGION WIN THE CUP?

MRS. MACDONALD, SQUAMISH PIONEER, PASSES

VALENTINE PARTY FOR SUNDAY SCHOOL

BRITANNIA CHILDREN HAVE ANNUAL VALENTINE PARTY

ANNOUNCEMENT

THE SQUAMISH REVIEW

EDITORIAL

CREDIT UNION

P.-T. ASSOCIATION FEATURES MUSICALE

JANITOR PROBLEM SOLVED

SQUAMISH RECREATIONAL ASSOCIATION ANNUAL REPORT

OLD TIMER PASSES

E. P. YARWOOD FLOWN TO VANCOUVER

BRITANNIA BEACH NEWS

RETURN OF FIRE UNIT

ORCHESTRA IN THE MAKING

[PHOTO]

VISIT TO GIBSONS

MRS MACDONALD

GET YOUR DOG LICENSE

NEW OFFICERS FOR W.A.

HARDY'S WESSEX CAPITAL

BASKETBALL SEASON ALMOST OVER

CARD OF THANKS

DAIRY DISCONTINUES LOCAL RETAIL TRADE

ELECTRICAL SHOP OPENS FOR BUSINESS

[PHOTO]

SQUAMISH, PAST AND FUTURE

TEACHERS CONVERSE

LONG WINTER COMES TO AN END

COMING EVENTS

PERSONALS

ENGLISH PRAYER BOOK 400TH ANNIVERSARY BEING CELEBRATED

BIGGER WAX SUPPLIES

LOCAL GIRL WED

PUBLIC CEREMONIES PLANNED

CANDLE LIT CARD PARTY

DIM OUT

DIAMOND HEAD EXPECTS BUSY SEASON

RED LETTER DAY

Squamish Review

Trapping shelter at Elaho

Trapping shelter at Elaho built by Charles Schoonover. The men belong to Mather's logging outfit. Photo taken around 1908 - 1909.

Elaho River forms the west branch of the Squamish River. It is named for the Indian word meaning "good hunting area".

Charlie and Elvira Schoonover

Charlie and Elvira Schoonover pictured in front of their home in the upper valley, across from the power station.

417477 Government Road
This lovely log house was built by Charles Schoonover in 1932. Having worked as a hunter, trapper, and logger further up in the valley for nearly 30 years, Schoonover settled his family here in a house that reflected the beauty of the forests he loved.

Original use: Private residence.
Current use: Private residence.
Current condition: Very well maintained.

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