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Squamish Advance: Thursday, August 23, 1951

TOT NARROWLY ESCAPES DEATH

SCHOLARSHIP AWARDED BY SCHOOL BOARD

SCHOOL BUILDING SHOWING PROGRESS

LOSES FOREARM IN RAIL MISHAP

IMPROVEMENTS TO LOCAL STREETS

ANGLICAN CHURCH IS RENOVATED

ELKS NEW HOME MOVED TO SITE

LOCAL AND PERSONAL

CUCKOO CLOCK HOUSE HEARD OVER CBC
[PHOTO]

BRACKENDALE

FORMER LOCAL GIRL IS TENNIS STAR

CLASSIFIED ADS

BILL HERBERT
[PHOTO]
TO COVER ROYAL TOUR

SUNSHINE SOCIETY HEARD DAILY OVER CBC
[PHOTO]

KNEES TAKE BEATING

BOARD OF TRADE VISITS CHALET

MURIEL MILLARD
[PHOTO]
HEARD OVER CBC

Squamish Advance

Squamish Advance: Thursday, November 1, 1951

HOSPITAL BUILDING RISING RAPIDLY

HALLOWE'EN PARTY VERY SUCCESSFUL

BADMINTON CLUB CHOOSES OFFICERS

FINAL REPORT ON SQUAMISH FALL FAIR

NEW SCHOOL IS NEARLY READY

GYM CLASSES TO START ON SUNDAY

BRACKENDALE

WOODFIBRE GIRL WINS TALENT CONTEST

LEGION NOTES

THE CRADLE

LOCAL AND PERSONAL

W.A. WHIST DRIVE

KINDERGARTEN OF THE AIR
[PHOTO]

HOWE SOUNDINGS
BY WHOSIT

CBC HEADQUARTERS
[PHOTO]

PTA TO HEAR ADDRESS ON PARENT EDUCATION

BOY SCOUT NEWS

PGE OFFERS NEW PASSENGER SERVICE

CLASSIFIED ADS

SHOW HORSE HERE

SQUAMISH HAS QUIET HALLOWE'EN

FORMER RESIDENT VISITS CHILDHOOD HOME

BEAUTY SALON MOVES TO NEW LOCATION

THE BARBERSHOP QUARTET
[PHOTO]

Squamish Advance

Squamish Advance: Thursday, September 13, 1951

LOGS ROLL AGAIN

MANY CHANGES IN SCHOOL STAFF

OPPORTUNITY FOR BUDDING ARTISTS

BOARD OF TRADE RESUMES WORK

ORCHESTRA FUNCTIONS AGAIN IN SQUAMISH

SURPRISE SHOWER FOR LOCAL BRIDE

FIRE BURNS THROUGH LOGGED-OVER AREA

LOCAL AND PERSONAL

RUBY CHAMBERS
[PHOTO]

REPORTER'S DREAM COMES TRUE

ALISON GRANT
[PHOTO]

A SKIERS PARADIES
[PHOTO]

FIRE BURNS

CLASSIFIED ADS

DANCE PRIZE WINNERS

BRACKENDALE

PLANT SALE IS SUCCESS

Squamish Advance

Squamish Advance: Thursday, September 18, 1952

FIRST POLIO CASE RECORDED HERE

PGE RAILROAD HISTORY MADE

FORMER RESIDENT IS LAID AT REST

TENDERS CALLED FOR DREDGING JOB

PTA HOLDS FIRST FALL MEETING

TWO HURT IN TRAIN ACCIDENT

SQUAMISH HOSPITAL OFFICIALLY OPENED

FINISH SURVEY BY HELICOPTER

LOCAL AND PERSONAL

CLASSIFIED ADS

ROADS IN SHOCKING STATE

THE CRADLE

SOCRED CLOB IS FORMED HERE

BRACKENDALE

HOSPITAL INSURANCE

READING MATERIAL NEEDED FOR PATIENTS

WOODFIBRE WINS FINAL GAME

CARD OF THANKS

Squamish Advance: Thursday, March 27, 1952

SQUAMISH ROAD SHELVED AGAIN

IMPROVEMENTS TO ROAD AND LANES

'51'S GOOD CITIZEN?

CANCER CAMPAIGN

APRIL CONCERT

THE CRADLE

H.S. JOURNALISM CLUB TOURS CITY

MORE SUGAR FOR HOSPITAL FUND

CARSON TO SPEAK

J.A. MEMBERS TO RECEIVE AWARDS

WESTMINSTER ELKS VISIT SQUAMISH

MORE WORK ON LEGION HALL

BUILD PARKING PLACE

LOCAL AND PERSONAL

SNOWMOBILE GETS NEW DIFFERENTIAL

SCOUTS RECEIVE THEIR ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

WOODFIBRE WINS BADMINTON CUP

BRACKENDALE

VILLAGE OF SQUAMISH

NEW BUS WILL ARRIVE THIS WEEK

SUMMER SCENE AT DIAMOND HEAD IN GARIBALDI PARK

Squamish Advance

M Creek Bridge washout

On October 28, 1981, 4 vehicles plunged into a creek after debris flow had destroyed the M Creek Bridge on the Squamish Highway during heavy rains. 9 people died including Tammi Lee Boscariol, daughter of Squamish residents William and Anne Boscariol, and her boyfriend William Stewart Short.

Judd home

Judd home built in 1916. Still standing on Judd Road in Brackendale.

Although not the oldest structure in Squamish, the Judd Home (1199 Judd Road) is regarded by many to be one of the District's primary heritage resources, providing an important anchor in reconstructing the early history and development of Brackendale and Squamish. It is in association with the Judd Home that many other local heritage sites are best interpreted. Henry Judd (or Harry, as he was also known) and his wife Anne were among that small group of settlers which included the Robertsons, the Raes, William Mashiter, E.B. Madill, George Magee, Tom Reid, and a few others who are now regarded as the Pioneers of the Squamish Valley.

Having made purchase by public lottery of a major piece of property covering much of what is Brackendale today, Henry Judd arrived in the Valley in 1889 to begin farming his land. Building his original home at the present site of the Brennan Home, Judd sold that house to his parents after marrying Barbara Anne Edwards, who had come to work at the Squamish Valley Hop Ranch. A new home was built by the young couple on the site of the present Judd House.

The present form of Brackendale did not begin to take shape until the subdivision of the Judd property in 1910 into 20 large lots along the Government Road, including the original lot purchased for the Brackendale Store. The original Judd Home itself burnt to the ground in 1916 and was rebuilt as the structure which stands there today as the current home of Mrs Farquharson, one of Henry and Anne Judd's youngest daughters.

Although not a "grand" structure, the Judd Home is nonetheless an attractive example of the functional charm of Western farm homes of the early part of the century. Perhaps more importantly, the Judd home and the lovely surrounding property on which it stands are a reminder of the farming history of Brackendale, and the industriousness of the earliest settlers in Squamish.

Original use: Private residential / farmhouse.
Current use: Private residential.
Current condition: Although some renovation has occurred, the Judd Home maintains most of its original form. Some restoration would be required to bring it back to its original condition. The large property on which it stands is beautifully landscaped and private, allowing a setting which adds to the character of the house.

Cliff Thorne and Harold Thorne

Cliff Thorne and Harold Thorne on horseback by "Old Grey Barn" on Squamish Valley Hop Company Ranch.

Hop farming was Squamish's first major industry. The major producer was Squamish Valley Hop Raising Co. (Bell-Irving Ranch). Hops are perennials and grown about 6 feet apart. They are picked during September and August. Hops are dried and bleached with sulphur in a kiln. In Squamish, Chinese labour was brought in to tend the hops. Local Indians were the pickers. They would camp in the area now between Petro Canada gas station and the Cottonwood condominiums. The hops in Squamish were top grade. They were shipped to Vancouver in bales wrapped in Burlap, then shipped to Britain where they were used to make beer.

Timeline
1890 - Hops first grown by E.B. Madill.
1891, February - Group from Puyallup Valley (near Tacoma) examined Squamish as potential hop growing area. The Squamish Valley Hop Raising Company was formed by Vancouver businessmen. Dr Bell-Irving (great uncle of previous Lieutenant Governor) was owner of the company. President was William Shannon and Secretary was T.T. Black; and Directors: Dr Bell-Irving, W.E. Green, George Magee, E.L. Phillips.
1892 - The Squamish Valley Hop Raising Company leased land from E.B. Madill. 1.5 acres of hop vine nursery stock was planted. In addition, 260 acres were purchased, 20 acres of which were cleared. Ranch was in the present location of Eagle Run extending from Heidenriech's house to Judd Road to Horse Creek. Frank H. Potter, a hop rancher from Puyallup, became a manager. No hops grown but frame house and out-buildings built for Potter.
1893, Fall - 5 acres hops grown on Madill's leased property. No hops grown on Squamish Valley Hop Company's own land. 40 acres cleared but planted potatoes, oats, and hat. W. Shannon still president of the company. Chas. McLaughlin, secretary.
1894 - Fred Clayton Thorne replaced Frank Potter as manager of Squamish Valley Hop Company. Hop industry began to thrive. Allen Rae, E.B. Madill, George Magee, and Tom Reid grew hops.
1897 - D.H. Tweedie was manager of Madill's hop ranch.
1898 - Charles Rose was manager of Squamish Valley Hop Company (Bell-Irving ranch). Wife, Alice, was ranch cook.
1906, March - 28 acres of hops planted at Bell-Irving ranch.
1914 - With beginning if war, hop prices fell. Hop ranches were shut down. The Squamish Valley Hop Company was owned by Dr Bell Irving and Mr Murry (manager of Bank of Commerce in Vancouver) owned ranch at that time. Fred Thorne took over Squamish Valley Hope Company ranch and started raising short horn cattle.
1917 - Hop industry had died in Squamish.
~1931 - George Carson was running his brother Robert (Bob) Carson's hop ranch when it burned down.
1944 - Roderick Mackenzie owned old Squamish Hop Co. ranch. Referred to as the mackenzie Ranch or the Pig or Hog Ranch. Since he produced hops for export to help the war effort, it received those names.

Men saddling horses

Men saddling horses by "Old Grey Barn" on Squamish Valley Hop Company Ranch.

Hop farming was Squamish's first major industry. The major producer was Squamish Valley Hop Raising Co. (Bell-Irving Ranch). Hops are perennials and grown about 6 feet apart. They are picked during September and August. Hops are dried and bleached with sulphur in a kiln. In Squamish, Chinese labour was brought in to tend the hops. Local Indians were the pickers. They would camp in the area now between Petro Canada gas station and the Cottonwood condominiums. The hops in Squamish were top grade. They were shipped to Vancouver in bales wrapped in Burlap, then shipped to Britain where they were used to make beer.

Timeline
1890 - Hops first grown by E.B. Madill.
1891, February - Group from Puyallup Valley (near Tacoma) examined Squamish as potential hop growing area. The Squamish Valley Hop Raising Company was formed by Vancouver businessmen. Dr Bell-Irving (great uncle of previous Lieutenant Governor) was owner of the company. President was William Shannon and Secretary was T.T. Black; and Directors: Dr Bell-Irving, W.E. Green, George Magee, E.L. Phillips.
1892 - The Squamish Valley Hop Raising Company leased land from E.B. Madill. 1.5 acres of hop vine nursery stock was planted. In addition, 260 acres were purchased, 20 acres of which were cleared. Ranch was in the present location of Eagle Run extending from Heidenriech's house to Judd Road to Horse Creek. Frank H. Potter, a hop rancher from Puyallup, became a manager. No hops grown but frame house and out-buildings built for Potter.
1893, Fall - 5 acres hops grown on Madill's leased property. No hops grown on Squamish Valley Hop Company's own land. 40 acres cleared but planted potatoes, oats, and hat. W. Shannon still president of the company. Chas. McLaughlin, secretary.
1894 - Fred Clayton Thorne replaced Frank Potter as manager of Squamish Valley Hop Company. Hop industry began to thrive. Allen Rae, E.B. Madill, George Magee, and Tom Reid grew hops.
1897 - D.H. Tweedie was manager of Madill's hop ranch.
1898 - Charles Rose was manager of Squamish Valley Hop Company (Bell-Irving ranch). Wife, Alice, was ranch cook.
1906, March - 28 acres of hops planted at Bell-Irving ranch.
1914 - With beginning if war, hop prices fell. Hop ranches were shut down. The Squamish Valley Hop Company was owned by Dr Bell Irving and Mr Murry (manager of Bank of Commerce in Vancouver) owned ranch at that time. Fred Thorne took over Squamish Valley Hope Company ranch and started raising short horn cattle.
1917 - Hop industry had died in Squamish.
~1931 - George Carson was running his brother Robert (Bob) Carson's hop ranch when it burned down.
1944 - Roderick Mackenzie owned old Squamish Hop Co. ranch. Referred to as the mackenzie Ranch or the Pig or Hog Ranch. Since he produced hops for export to help the war effort, it received those names.

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