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View of Squamish around 1901 - 1905

View of Squamish around 1901 - 1905. View of Mamquam River before it changed its course. Magee's hay field on the left.

Mamquam River was named for the Indian word meaning "smelly water".

Squamish is named for the Indian word "Squohomish" (various spellings) meaning "strong wind". The name was changed to Newport in 1911 by the H.S. and P.V.N. Railway and was changed back on September 14, 1914 as the result of a contest for school children. The name had to be changed since there was another town in BC named Newport. The twelve final names considered in the contest were: Newport, Strathacona, Prince Arthur, Kingsport, Great Haven, Columbia, Imperial, Squamish, Pacificgate, Bonaventure, and Viveleroi.

The Chief

"The Chief" photographed in 1912 from the home of E.D. Reeves, the first telegraph operator in Squamish.

This granite monolith is approximately 700 metres high and is second only to Gibraltar in size. It is so named because its outline against the sky forms the profile of a sleeping Indian chief. The profile of a chief's face can also be seen in the rock.

Garibaldi Lake

Garibaldi Mountain was named for the great Italian nationalist Giuseppe Garibaldi. Apparently, it was named by an Italian serving as a sailor on a survey ship, the mountain being in view on Garibaldi's birthday (July 4).
The 2678 metre tall mountain is a dormant composite volcano. The last series of eruptions occurred 10,000 years ago. It was first climbed in 1907 by J. Trorey, A. Dalton, W. Dalton, C. Warren, A. King, and T. Pattison.

Garibaldi Lake

Garibaldi Mountain was named for the great Italian nationalist Giuseppe Garibaldi. Apparently, it was named by an Italian serving as a sailor on a survey ship, the mountain being in view on Garibaldi's birthday (July 4).
The 2678 metre tall mountain is a dormant composite volcano. The last series of eruptions occurred 10,000 years ago. It was first climbed in 1907 by J. Trorey, A. Dalton, W. Dalton, C. Warren, A. King, and T. Pattison.

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