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Austin Harry on saw

B.P.O.E. Lodge (Hudson House) in background.

Austin Harry (Peḵultn Siyam), of Squamish Nation, lived in Sta-a-mis in the early 1900's.

38033 Second Avenue
Hudson House was originally built in the 1930's as a local community hall (PGE Hall). Built by railway and community volunteers, the PGE Hall was once the site of basketball games, dances, and other gala community events. It later became the Hudson House, and then an empty lot.

Original Use: Community Hall.
1993 use: Rooming House (Hudson House).
1993 condition: Retained original form without significant alteration. Location among newer buildings left the Hall looking somewhat run down.

George Harry and Ernie Harry

George Harry (Xwach-la-nexw) on left and Ernie Harry (Peḵultn Siyam) at Kow-tain village.

Ernie Harry's grandfather, Charlie Douglas, lived on the K-YAU-tain reserve for quite some time in the early 1900's and worked as a logger for Al Barbour.

Stamish Creek Bridge, late 1940's

The Squamish language spelling of Stawamus is STA-a-mus which is a variant of the word Sta-mus, which means shelter. Squamish is another variation of the word and means "birthplace of the winds". Pioneers often used "Stamish" instead of "Stawamus". The name refers to the Squamish Nation reserve at the mouth of the Squamish River (Reserve #24), the Stawamus River, the area drained by it and the "Chief".

Workers at Sardis Hop Farm

Hop farming was Squamish's first major industry. The major producer was Squamish Valley Hop Raising Co. (Bell-Irving Ranch). Hops are perennials and grown about 6 feet apart. They are picked during September and August. Hops are dried and bleached with sulphur in a kiln. In Squamish, Chinese labour was brought in to tend the hops. Local First Nations were the pickers. They would camp in the area now between Petro Canada gas station and the Cottonwood condominiums. The hops in Squamish were top grade. They were shipped to Vancouver in bales wrapped in Burlap, then shipped to Britain where they were used to make beer.

Yapp's Logging Camp 1910

In 1907, Allan Newton Barbour and his brother Charles came to Squamish and logged using 6 yoke of oxen and took out six 24' logs a "turn" (load). The area logged was near the PGE Shops (by Castle's Crossing), across the river rom the shops, on the Burnt Ground near the cemetery, at Paradise Valley, and about five miles north of Cheekye. 2 to 20 men were employed. It was customary to log close to the river so the logs just had to be dragged into the river and floated to the Howe Sound where they were picked up by the Powell River company tugs and taken up to their mills. Log jams were broken up by men in canoes. Mr McComb was the first to tow logs down the river in a boat. The Barbours would later sell out to Mr Yapp. Mr Yapp's Squamish Timber Company was incorporated on March 21, 1907. In 1910, the Yapp Company cleared the Cheekye area. A steam donkey would haul the logs 400 feet and then an 8 horse team hauled them 1/2 mile on a skid road. Another donkey, called a roader, took the logs to the river. Here the logs followed a log trough. Instead of chokers, logging dogs were used. When the Howe Sound Northern Railway came into Cheakamus, the Yapp company used the train to transport logs to the booming grounds at Squamish. In 1911, a company owned by Mr Lamb took over the Yapp stand of timber.

Research compiled by Eric Andersen, 2011: This photo, apparently taken by one of the Magee brothers, shows the construction phase of the flume project. The occassion is a visit to the site by Hughie Mills' new bride Catherine, the former Mrs Allen Rae, in the Spring of 1910. In this photo, Hughie Mills appears to be giving his wife a tour of the project. Mills was a building contractor in the valley, and very likely worked on the flume construction. The location is at the west side of the Squamish Timber Company camp, just above the bank of the Brohm River, which is to the left from this scene. It is difficult to tell from the photograph whether the water for the flume is being led from the Brohm River (in the back and to the left of of the photo) or the Cheekye River (around to the right). Either is possible. The Squamish Timber Co. camp and the beginning of the flume lies between the Brohm River and the Cheekye River. Water for the flume might be more easily taken from the Brohm( closer), but the Cheekye has the steeper gradient. The larger the logs to be flumed, and the steeper the grade, the more water is required.

Yapp's Camp, 1907

Located at present BC Hydro site.
Photo by: Magee.

In 1907, Allan Newton Barbour and his brother Charles came to Squamish and logged using 6 yoke of oxen and took out six 24' logs a "turn" (load). The area logged was near the PGE Shops (by Castle's Crossing), across the river rom the shops, on the Burnt Ground near the cemetery, at Paradise Valley, and about five miles north of Cheekye. 2 to 20 men were employed. It was customary to log close to the river so the logs just had to be dragged into the river and floated to the Howe Sound where they were picked up by the Powell River company tugs and taken up to their mills. Log jams were broken up by men in canoes. Mr McComb was the first to tow logs down the river in a boat. The Barbours would later sell out to Mr Yapp. Mr Yapp's Squamish Timber Company was incorporated on March 21, 1907. In 1910, the Yapp Company cleared the Cheekye area. A steam donkey would haul the logs 400 feet and then an 8 horse team hauled them 1/2 mile on a skid road. Another donkey, called a roader, took the logs to the river. Here the logs followed a log trough. Instead of chokers, logging dogs were used. When the Howe Sound Northern Railway came into Cheakamus, the Yapp company used the train to transport logs to the booming grounds at Squamish. In 1911, a company owned by Mr Lamb took over the Yapp stand of timber.

Research compiled by Eric Andersen, 2011: This photo, apparently taken by one of the Magee brothers, shows the construction phase of the flume project. The location is at the west side of the Squamish Timber Company camp, just above the bank of the Brohm River, which is to the left from this scene. It is difficult to tell from the photograph whether the water for the flume is being led from the Brohm River (in the back and to the left of of the photo) or the Cheekye River (around to the right). Either is possible. The Squamish Timber Co. camp and the beginning of the flume lies between the Brohm River and the Cheekye River. Water for the flume might be more easily taken from the Brohm (closer), but the Cheekye has the steeper gradient. The larger the logs to be flumed, and the steeper the grade, the more water is required.

Yapp's logging camp

Yapp's logging camp on the Cheekye River above the railroad bridge. Photo taken around 1910.

In 1907, Allan Newton Barbour and his brother Charles came to Squamish and logged using 6 yoke of oxen and took out six 24' logs a "turn" (load). The area logged was near the PGE Shops (by Castle's Crossing), across the river rom the shops, on the Burnt Ground near the cemetery, at Paradise Valley, and about five miles north of Cheekye. 2 to 20 men were employed. It was customary to log close to the river so the logs just had to be dragged into the river and floated to the Howe Sound where they were picked up by the Powell River company tugs and taken up to their mills. Log jams were broken up by men in canoes. Mr McComb was the first to tow logs down the river in a boat. The Barbours would later sell out to Mr Yapp. Mr Yapp's Squamish Timber Company was incorporated on March 21, 1907. In 1910, the Yapp Company cleared the Cheekye area. A steam donkey would haul the logs 400 feet and then an 8 horse team hauled them 1/2 mile on a skid road. Another donkey, called a roader, took the logs to the river. Here the logs followed a log trough. Instead of chokers, logging dogs were used. When the Howe Sound Northern Railway came into Cheakamus, the Yapp company used the train to transport logs to the booming grounds at Squamish. In 1911, a company owned by Mr Lamb took over the Yapp stand of timber.

Research compiled by Eric Andersen, 2011: The location of the camp is actually above the highway bridge and not the railway bridge.
The Squamish Timber Company is often referred to as "Yapp's", after company boss Chester Yapp. According to one source, the company was incorporated in March 1907. It was operating on the Cheekye Fan by 1908.

Logging camp

Logging camp owned and operated by Allan and Charles Barbour - about 1907.

Research compiled by Eric Andersen, 2011: This photo, apparently taken by one of the Magee brothers, shows the construction phase of the flume project. The location is at the west side of the Squamish Timber Company camp, just above the bank of the Brohm River, which is to the left from this scene. It is difficult to tell from the photograph whether the water for the flume is being led from the Brohm River (in the back and to the left of of the photo) or the Cheekye River (around to the right). Either is possible. The Squamish Timber Co. camp and the beginning of the flume lies between the Brohm River and the Cheekye River. Water for the flume might be more easily taken from the Brohm which is closer, however the Cheekye has a steeper gradient. The larger the logs to be flumed, and the steeper the grade, the more water is required.
The log flume was probably used for transporting long cedar shingle bolts, in standard 16-18 foot lengths. These would be boomed in the river, perhaps in the Jimmy Jimmy Slough (Judd Slough), and then delivered elsewhere for manufacturing into roofing shingles.

Huey Mills and Kate Mills

Huey Mills and Kate Mills (formerly Mrs Allan Rae) sitting in the background. Man in the foreground is unknown.

Research compiled by Eric Anderson, 2011: This photo, apparently taken by one of the Magee brothers, shows the construction phase of the flume project. The occassion is a visit to the site by Hughie Mills' new bride Catherine, the former Mrs Allen Rae, in the Spring of 1910. In this photo, Hughie Mills appears to be giving his wife a tour of the project. Mills was a building contractor in the valley, and very likely worked on the flume construction. The location is at the west side of the Squamish Timber Company camp, just above the bank of the Brohm River, which is to the left from this scene. It is difficult to tell from the photograph whether the water for the flume is being led from the Brohm River (in the back and to the left of of the photo) or the Cheekye River (around to the right). Either is possible. The Squamish Timber Co. camp and the beginning of the flume lies between the Brohm River and the Cheekye River. Water for the flume might be more easily taken from the Brohm( closer), but the Cheekye has the steeper gradient. The larger the logs to be flumed, and the steeper the grade, the more water is required.

Clifford Thorne and Lottie Fulk on horseback

Research compiled by Eric Andersen: Logging manager's daughter Lottie Fulk on hourseback riding with Cliffe Thorne, son of Squamish Valley Hop Raising Co. manager Fred Thorne, ca 1907. Lottie Fulk's father was Owen Fulk of Skagit County (WA) who was hired by the manager of E.K. Wood Lumber Co. to supervise Squamish River logging operations. During the five years Fulk was in Squamish, he was the valley's preeminent man of business.

Ella Clemeny, Minerva Rae, Ella Fulk

Left to right: Ella Clemeny (teacher), Minerva Rae, Ella Fulk

Research compiled by Eric Andersen: Schoolteacher Ella Clements, Minnie Rae, and Mrs Lola Fulk, 1907. Minnie Rae's 1907 diary refers to the Fulks, the upper valley camps, and Owen Fulk's business trips into town by steamship. Owen Fulk of Skagit County (WA) was hired by E.K. Wood Lumber Co. to supervise the Squamish River logging operations. During the five years or so Fulk was at Squamish, he was the valley's preeminent man of business.

Lamb's logging camp

Lamb's logging camp. Now present day cemetery.

Research compiled by Eric Andersen, 2011: Lamb Bros. Logging camp ca 1912, on present site of Garibaldi Cemetery. The Company ran a rail car loading operation similar to that of Squamish Timber Co. two miles to the north. The Cheekye log flume crossed this camp site, later occupied by a Japanese logging company.

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