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King George Hotel

Later became the Squamish Hotel and then the Ocean Port Hotel (37991 Second Avenue).

Although the original building has been altered nearly beyond recognition, the basic structure of the Squamish Hotel was constructed in 1910 as the King George Hotel by W.A. Holland. Like the Brackendale Store, the Squamish Hotel is a building which may hold heritage value to the community not for its present appearance, but for its prominence as a landmark and reference point in the local landscape for over 75 years.

Original use: Hotel, pub.
Current use: Hotel, pub, restaurant, Cold Beer and Wine Store.
Current condition: Nearly unrecognizable from the original form.

Merrill & Ring Logging Camp about 1930

Photo by: Bun Yarwood.

Merrill and Ring, an American company bought their claim in 1888 for 25 cents per acre. This went from Valleycliffe through the foothills to Brohm Lake. They did not set up in the valley until October 1926. The operation had come from Duncan Bay, before that they had been at Camp O near Alert Bay. Their first camp is where Valleycliffe is located now. They employed 200 people. The hiring was done by Loggers' Agencies in Vancouver. They would fall the trees with cross cut saws then haul the logs with a steam donkey to the train. They used a steam axe to split the wood as machines used only wood fuel at the time.

A lot of Merrill and Ring timber was burnt in a Norton McKinnon fire in 1927. The McKinnon's engine was given as payment. Aloysius McNalley and John Broomquist collected it. The same year, Arthur Edwards assisted in the building of the Merrill & Ring camp at Edith Lake.

In 1929, Merrill and Ring moved their operation across the Mamquam valley to Edith Lake east of Alice Lake. A settlement of 225 men was set up there. Railway track covered the mountainside from Cheekye River southward.

Merrill and Ring closed in 1930 due to the low price of logs during the Depression. Logs were selling from 5 to 6 dollars per thousand. At this time, the logs were hauled by train to the dump at the mouth of the Stawamus River. Merill and Ring started back up in 1932.

Merrill and Ring shut down 3 times in 1937: after New Years due to snow, due to fire season, and in the fall when a bridge over the Cheekye River was washed out. Merrill and Ring left Squamish in 1940.

May Day 1936 (?)

May Queen: Grace Moon (Mrs Tom Clarke).
Attendants: Anne Lasser (Mrs Moore) on the left, Phyllis Leach on the right.
Flower girl: Colleen Brooks (Mrs Drenka).

Judd home

Judd home built in 1916. Still standing on Judd Road in Brackendale.

Although not the oldest structure in Squamish, the Judd Home (1199 Judd Road) is regarded by many to be one of the District's primary heritage resources, providing an important anchor in reconstructing the early history and development of Brackendale and Squamish. It is in association with the Judd Home that many other local heritage sites are best interpreted. Henry Judd (or Harry, as he was also known) and his wife Anne were among that small group of settlers which included the Robertsons, the Raes, William Mashiter, E.B. Madill, George Magee, Tom Reid, and a few others who are now regarded as the Pioneers of the Squamish Valley.

Having made purchase by public lottery of a major piece of property covering much of what is Brackendale today, Henry Judd arrived in the Valley in 1889 to begin farming his land. Building his original home at the present site of the Brennan Home, Judd sold that house to his parents after marrying Barbara Anne Edwards, who had come to work at the Squamish Valley Hop Ranch. A new home was built by the young couple on the site of the present Judd House.

The present form of Brackendale did not begin to take shape until the subdivision of the Judd property in 1910 into 20 large lots along the Government Road, including the original lot purchased for the Brackendale Store. The original Judd Home itself burnt to the ground in 1916 and was rebuilt as the structure which stands there today as the current home of Mrs Farquharson, one of Henry and Anne Judd's youngest daughters.

Although not a "grand" structure, the Judd Home is nonetheless an attractive example of the functional charm of Western farm homes of the early part of the century. Perhaps more importantly, the Judd home and the lovely surrounding property on which it stands are a reminder of the farming history of Brackendale, and the industriousness of the earliest settlers in Squamish.

Original use: Private residential / farmhouse.
Current use: Private residential.
Current condition: Although some renovation has occurred, the Judd Home maintains most of its original form. Some restoration would be required to bring it back to its original condition. The large property on which it stands is beautifully landscaped and private, allowing a setting which adds to the character of the house.

Cliff Thorne and Harold Thorne

Cliff Thorne and Harold Thorne on horseback by "Old Grey Barn" on Squamish Valley Hop Company Ranch.

Hop farming was Squamish's first major industry. The major producer was Squamish Valley Hop Raising Co. (Bell-Irving Ranch). Hops are perennials and grown about 6 feet apart. They are picked during September and August. Hops are dried and bleached with sulphur in a kiln. In Squamish, Chinese labour was brought in to tend the hops. Local Indians were the pickers. They would camp in the area now between Petro Canada gas station and the Cottonwood condominiums. The hops in Squamish were top grade. They were shipped to Vancouver in bales wrapped in Burlap, then shipped to Britain where they were used to make beer.

Timeline
1890 - Hops first grown by E.B. Madill.
1891, February - Group from Puyallup Valley (near Tacoma) examined Squamish as potential hop growing area. The Squamish Valley Hop Raising Company was formed by Vancouver businessmen. Dr Bell-Irving (great uncle of previous Lieutenant Governor) was owner of the company. President was William Shannon and Secretary was T.T. Black; and Directors: Dr Bell-Irving, W.E. Green, George Magee, E.L. Phillips.
1892 - The Squamish Valley Hop Raising Company leased land from E.B. Madill. 1.5 acres of hop vine nursery stock was planted. In addition, 260 acres were purchased, 20 acres of which were cleared. Ranch was in the present location of Eagle Run extending from Heidenriech's house to Judd Road to Horse Creek. Frank H. Potter, a hop rancher from Puyallup, became a manager. No hops grown but frame house and out-buildings built for Potter.
1893, Fall - 5 acres hops grown on Madill's leased property. No hops grown on Squamish Valley Hop Company's own land. 40 acres cleared but planted potatoes, oats, and hat. W. Shannon still president of the company. Chas. McLaughlin, secretary.
1894 - Fred Clayton Thorne replaced Frank Potter as manager of Squamish Valley Hop Company. Hop industry began to thrive. Allen Rae, E.B. Madill, George Magee, and Tom Reid grew hops.
1897 - D.H. Tweedie was manager of Madill's hop ranch.
1898 - Charles Rose was manager of Squamish Valley Hop Company (Bell-Irving ranch). Wife, Alice, was ranch cook.
1906, March - 28 acres of hops planted at Bell-Irving ranch.
1914 - With beginning if war, hop prices fell. Hop ranches were shut down. The Squamish Valley Hop Company was owned by Dr Bell Irving and Mr Murry (manager of Bank of Commerce in Vancouver) owned ranch at that time. Fred Thorne took over Squamish Valley Hope Company ranch and started raising short horn cattle.
1917 - Hop industry had died in Squamish.
~1931 - George Carson was running his brother Robert (Bob) Carson's hop ranch when it burned down.
1944 - Roderick Mackenzie owned old Squamish Hop Co. ranch. Referred to as the mackenzie Ranch or the Pig or Hog Ranch. Since he produced hops for export to help the war effort, it received those names.

Motorcade arrives Squamish 1/2

Cartoon by Ken Barbour, 1 of 2.

Caption accompanying two cartoons:
... many years ago when the white men first came to the Squamish Valley they stole all the land from the Indians... the Chief put a curse on the white men and said that one day after the greedy white men had logged all the timber and fished all the streams a great new white leader would rise and build a great new trail and return the land to its rightful owners......

Mashiter School class picture

Left to right, 4th row: Norm MacDonald, Jack Quick, Les Moule, Jack Hutton.
3rd row: Lloyd Ingraham, Borden Dawson, Bernice Lowe, Bonnie Thorne, Bill Prendergast, Carl Johnson, Russel Lamoport.
2nd row: Jerry Lee (teacher), Mary Munro, Sylvia Edwards, Margaret Armstrong, Pauline Powell, Kate James, Vivian Ingraham.
1st row: Bill McAllister, Cleve Dawson, George Percy, Charlie Barnfield, George Geoffry.

Tall tree along tracks used by Merrill & Ring Logging

Photo by: Bun Yarwood, circa 1930.

Merrill and Ring, an American company bought their claim in 1888 for 25 cents per acre. This went from Valleycliffe through the foothills to Brohm Lake. They did not set up in the valley until October 1926. The operation had come from Duncan Bay, before that they had been at Camp O near Alert Bay. Their first camp is where Valleycliffe is located now. They employed 200 people. The hiring was done by Loggers' Agencies in Vancouver. They would fall the trees with cross cut saws then haul the logs with a steam donkey to the train. They used a steam axe to split the wood as machines used only wood fuel at the time.

A lot of Merrill and Ring timber was burnt in a Norton McKinnon fire in 1927. The McKinnon's engine was given as payment. Aloysius McNalley and John Broomquist collected it. The same year, Arthur Edwards assisted in the building of the Merrill & Ring camp at Edith Lake.

In 1929, Merrill and Ring moved their operation across the Mamquam valley to Edith Lake east of Alice Lake. A settlement of 225 men was set up there. Railway track covered the mountainside from Cheekye River southward.

Merrill and Ring closed in 1930 due to the low price of logs during the Depression. Logs were selling from 5 to 6 dollars per thousand. At this time, the logs were hauled by train to the dump at the mouth of the Stawamus River. Merill and Ring started back up in 1932.

Merrill and Ring shut down 3 times in 1937: after New Years due to snow, due to fire season, and in the fall when a bridge over the Cheekye River was washed out. Merrill and Ring left Squamish in 1940.

Interior of St John (Anglican) Church

Original altar windows (1913-1920) donated by "friends in England". Later when they were damaged beyond repair, they were replaced by those that were a memorial to Mrs Mashiter. Organ thought to belong to Mrs Mashiter, used until the present organ was acquired in 1920.

This Anglican Church on Sixth Avenue was the only church north of Gibson's Landing for many years. The church served the needs of the entire Christian community from the earliest days when Mr Mashiter alternated his Anglican Sunday services with Presbyterian Minister Dr. Robert Young, to the first Lutheran services in town held there by Reverend C. Guebert in the late 1950's.

For a brief period in the early 1920's, the church boasted fine stain glass windows until the stone-throwing enthusiasm of local children forced their removal. Many of their children now own windows of their own in Squamish.

The church has now been tastefully converted into a Dance Studio.

Original use: Church.
Current: Dance studio.
Current condition: Well maintained, new use as dance studio respects original character.

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