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Booming logs in Newport, 1904

Booming logs in Newport, BC (Squamish, 1904).

Squamish's name was changed to Newport in 1911 by the H.S. and P.V.N. Railway and was changed back on September 14, 1914 as the result of a contest for school children. The name had to be changed since there was another town in BC named Newport. The twelve final names considered in the contest were: Newport, Strathacona, Prince Arthur, Kingsport, Great Haven, Columbia, Imperial, Squamish, Pacificgate, Bonaventure, and Viveleroi. Squamish is named for the Indian word "Squohomish" (various spellings) meaning "strong wind".

View of Squamish around 1901 - 1905

View of Squamish around 1901 - 1905. View of Mamquam River before it changed its course. Magee's hay field on the left.

Mamquam River was named for the Indian word meaning "smelly water".

Squamish is named for the Indian word "Squohomish" (various spellings) meaning "strong wind". The name was changed to Newport in 1911 by the H.S. and P.V.N. Railway and was changed back on September 14, 1914 as the result of a contest for school children. The name had to be changed since there was another town in BC named Newport. The twelve final names considered in the contest were: Newport, Strathacona, Prince Arthur, Kingsport, Great Haven, Columbia, Imperial, Squamish, Pacificgate, Bonaventure, and Viveleroi.

Brackendale School picture, 1905

Left to right: Bert Rae, Maurice Rae, Thorne girl (likely Edna), Ethel Herres, Olive Judd, ?, Wilby Judd, Earl Judd, Lizzy Herres, ?, Harold Thorne, Belle Herres, Rae boy (likely Herbert Lawson).
Teacher: Mr Alexander Stephen.

Cleveland Avenue House [Back]

Sepia-toned photo of a house with three people on the porch. The house is believed to have been on Cleveland Ave, built around 1905 and demolished in 1960s. A handwritten description is on the back.

Judd residence, flood 1906

Judd residence looking into backyard during flood of 1906 (September 6).

The present form of Brackendale did not begin to take shape until the subdivision of the Judd property in 1910 into 20 large lots along the Government Road, including the original lot purchased for the Brackendale Store. The original Judd Home itself burnt to the ground in 1916 and was rebuilt as the structure which stands there today as the current home of Mrs Farquharson, one of Henry and Anne Judd's youngest daughters.

Henry Judd (or Harry, as he was also known) and his wife Anne were among that small group of settlers which included the Robertsons, the Raes, William Mashiter, E.B. Madill, George Magee, Tom Reid, and a few others who are now regarded as the Pioneers of the Squamish Valley.

Having made purchase by public lottery of a major piece of property covering much of what is Brackendale today, Henry Judd arrived in the Valley in 1889 to begin farming his land. Building his original home at the present site of the Brennan Home, Judd sold that house to his parents after marrying Barbara Anne Edwards, who had come to work at the Squamish Valley Hop Ranch. A new home was built by the young couple on the site of the present Judd House.

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