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Squamish Valley Museum (Brightbill House) Photograph Collection
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View of the Chief, 1914

Photo by: Evans.

This granite monolith is approximately 700 metres high and is second only to Gibraltar in size. It is so named because its outline against the sky forms the profile of a sleeping Indian chief. The profile of a chief's face can also be seen in the rock.

The actual Indian spelling of Stawamus is STA-a-mus and is a variant of Squamish and means "birthplace of the winds". Pioneers often used "Stamish" instead of "Stawamus". The name refers to the Indian reserve at the mouth of the Squamish River (Reserve #24), the Stawamus River, the area drained by it and the "Chief".

Street scene, Newport BC

Squamish's name was changed to Newport in 1911 by the H.S. and P.V.N. Railway and was changed back on September 14, 1914 as the result of a contest for school children. The name had to be changed since there was another town in BC named Newport. The twelve final names considered in the contest were: Newport, Strathacona, Prince Arthur, Kingsport, Great Haven, Columbia, Imperial, Squamish, Pacificgate, Bonaventure, and Viveleroi. Squamish is named for the Indian word "Squohomish" (various spellings) meaning "strong wind".

Norton-McKinnon Logging Company

Four loggers unknown.

In 1911, McKinnon and Norton of the Newport Timber Company were logging in Squamish in the area known as the base camp road, near Curly Lews' place. They had donkeys, a large shay engine, and a weird whistle. Mr McKinnon was a bartender and Mr Norton was a logger. Amedy Levesque and George Laviolette worked as brakemen on the locomotive. The camp was run by Mr Fuller.

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