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Cheakamus
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Brackendale & Cheakamus stage

Brackendale & Cheakamus stage in 1910 (or 1908?), driven by Henry Judd. Judd started with oxen in 1903 and later changed to horses. This pictured incarnation of the stage was known as the "Rapid". In 1912, it was supplemented by a new Garford motor truck. Harry Judd provided transportation services between Squamish Dock and the Cheakamus Lodge at Cheekye -the beginning of the Pemberton Trail.

Cheakamus River from bridge

The original spelling of the Cheakamus area (river and canyon) is chee-YAK-mush which is Indian for "fish weir". A slight variation in belief is that the original Indian spelling is Tsee-ark-amiskt which means "fish trap" and refers to the difficulty salmon have in travelling up the river.

Cheekye as seen from the bridge

Cheekye is from the Indian name for Mount Garibald - in-ch-KAI which means "dirty place". The mountain was so named since dirty snow would result when dust would be blown onto the snowfields from cinder cones and lava. The pioneers adapted this name to the area and river.

Firefighters - 1913

Firefighters at the "halfway" between Upper Squamish and Cheekye. Paid $0.25 / hour.

Seated far left, Mr Morbray (fire warden); seated left with white hat, Oswald (Ozzie) Ray; far right seated on bench, Charles Sherman Schoonover; seated next to him, Paul Sellons; standing far right, Compton Reade.

Huey Mills and Kate Mills

Huey Mills and Kate Mills (formerly Mrs Allan Rae) sitting in the background. Man in the foreground is unknown.

Research compiled by Eric Anderson, 2011: This photo, apparently taken by one of the Magee brothers, shows the construction phase of the flume project. The occassion is a visit to the site by Hughie Mills' new bride Catherine, the former Mrs Allen Rae, in the Spring of 1910. In this photo, Hughie Mills appears to be giving his wife a tour of the project. Mills was a building contractor in the valley, and very likely worked on the flume construction. The location is at the west side of the Squamish Timber Company camp, just above the bank of the Brohm River, which is to the left from this scene. It is difficult to tell from the photograph whether the water for the flume is being led from the Brohm River (in the back and to the left of of the photo) or the Cheekye River (around to the right). Either is possible. The Squamish Timber Co. camp and the beginning of the flume lies between the Brohm River and the Cheekye River. Water for the flume might be more easily taken from the Brohm( closer), but the Cheekye has the steeper gradient. The larger the logs to be flumed, and the steeper the grade, the more water is required.

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