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Church of St John the Divine

Anglican church.

Church of Saint John the Divine, Newport, BC was erected between May 15th and July 1st, 1913. It was officially opened and dedicated on July 20th, 1913 by the Right Reverend A.U. DePencier, Bishop of the Diocese of New Westminster.

This Anglican Church on Sixth Avenue was the only church north of Gibson's Landing for many years. The church served the needs of the entire Christian community from the earliest days when Mr Mashiter alternated his Anglican Sunday services with Presbyterian Minister Dr. Robert Young, to the first Lutheran services in town held there by Reverend C. Guebert in the late 1950's.

For a brief period in the early 1920's, the church boasted fine stain glass windows until the stone-throwing enthusiasm of local children forced their removal. Many of their children now own windows of their own in Squamish.

The church has now been tastefully converted into a Dance Studio.

Original use: Church.
Current: Dance studio.
Current condition: Well maintained, new use as dance studio respects original character.

The Harry Billbright home

The Harry Billbright home when it was first built. It was located on 2nd Avenue in the current location of the Credit Union then moved to Stan Clarke Park and used as a Museum.

It was built in 1933 for Harry "Brownie" Brightbill, railway engineer on the "Fisherman's Special" from Squamish to Lillooet. It was constructed by Herb Dawson. The house was purchased by the District during the Mayorship of Pat Brennan. Cause for considerable disagreement in the community at the time, it may be argued that the controversy surrounding that decision has only added to any heritage value the building already had.

In June 2000, the Brightbill house was moved to the West Coast Railway Heritage Park and was one of the first exhibits to open in the new Town Square community area.

Condition: It was well maintained the Squamish Museum where it was housed was closed. There were problems with vandalism.

Original use: Residential home.

Merrill & Ring Logging Camp

Merrill and Ring, an American company bought their claim in 1888 for 25 cents per acre. This went from Valleycliffe through the foothills to Brohm Lake. They did not set up in the valley until October 1926. The operation had come from Duncan Bay, before that they had been at Camp O near Alert Bay. Their first camp is where Valleycliffe is located now. They employed 200 people. The hiring was done by Loggers' Agencies in Vancouver. They would fall the trees with cross cut saws then haul the logs with a steam donkey to the train. They used a steam axe to split the wood as machines used only wood fuel at the time.

A lot of Merrill and Ring timber was burnt in a Norton McKinnon fire in 1927. The McKinnon's engine was given as payment. Aloysius McNalley and John Broomquist collected it. The same year, Arthur Edwards assisted in the building of the Merrill & Ring camp at Edith Lake.

In 1929, Merrill and Ring moved their operation across the Mamquam valley to Edith Lake east of Alice Lake. A settlement of 225 men was set up there. Railway track covered the mountainside from Cheekye River southward.

Merrill and Ring closed in 1930 due to the low price of logs during the Depression. Logs were selling from 5 to 6 dollars per thousand. At this time, the logs were hauled by train to the dump at the mouth of the Stawamus River. Merill and Ring started back up in 1932.

Merrill and Ring shut down 3 times in 1937: after New Years due to snow, due to fire season, and in the fall when a bridge over the Cheekye River was washed out. Merrill and Ring left Squamish in 1940.

Logging camp

Logging camp owned and operated by Allan and Charles Barbour - about 1907.

Research compiled by Eric Andersen, 2011: This photo, apparently taken by one of the Magee brothers, shows the construction phase of the flume project. The location is at the west side of the Squamish Timber Company camp, just above the bank of the Brohm River, which is to the left from this scene. It is difficult to tell from the photograph whether the water for the flume is being led from the Brohm River (in the back and to the left of of the photo) or the Cheekye River (around to the right). Either is possible. The Squamish Timber Co. camp and the beginning of the flume lies between the Brohm River and the Cheekye River. Water for the flume might be more easily taken from the Brohm which is closer, however the Cheekye has a steeper gradient. The larger the logs to be flumed, and the steeper the grade, the more water is required.
The log flume was probably used for transporting long cedar shingle bolts, in standard 16-18 foot lengths. These would be boomed in the river, perhaps in the Jimmy Jimmy Slough (Judd Slough), and then delivered elsewhere for manufacturing into roofing shingles.

Merrill & Ring logging operation

Merrill and Ring, an American company bought their claim in 1888 for 25 cents per acre. This went from Valleycliffe through the foothills to Brohm Lake. They did not set up in the valley until October 1926. The operation had come from Duncan Bay, before that they had been at Camp O near Alert Bay. Their first camp is where Valleycliffe is located now. They employed 200 people. The hiring was done by Loggers' Agencies in Vancouver. They would fall the trees with cross cut saws then haul the logs with a steam donkey to the train. They used a steam axe to split the wood as machines used only wood fuel at the time.

A lot of Merrill and Ring timber was burnt in a Norton McKinnon fire in 1927. The McKinnon's engine was given as payment. Aloysius McNalley and John Broomquist collected it. The same year, Arthur Edwards assisted in the building of the Merrill & Ring camp at Edith Lake.

In 1929, Merrill and Ring moved their operation across the Mamquam valley to Edith Lake east of Alice Lake. A settlement of 225 men was set up there. Railway track covered the mountainside from Cheekye River southward.

Merrill and Ring closed in 1930 due to the low price of logs during the Depression. Logs were selling from 5 to 6 dollars per thousand. At this time, the logs were hauled by train to the dump at the mouth of the Stawamus River. Merill and Ring started back up in 1932.

Merrill and Ring shut down 3 times in 1937: after New Years due to snow, due to fire season, and in the fall when a bridge over the Cheekye River was washed out. Merrill and Ring left Squamish in 1940.

Merrill & Ring "4 Spot" gas locomotive at M&R Camp

1929 Merrill & Ring "4 Spot" gas locomotive at M&R Camp, Edith (Baloney) Lake. 13x15 Williamette Trackside Unit (Yarder @ Loader) behind 4 spot. Williamette is pronounced with accent on the Williamette. These (M&R had 2) units 2 cyl. 13x15. Ready for service with all lines etc @ water. Weighed about 100 tons. Ed Aldridge used to move them with the "4 Spot". Comment by Ed Aldridge.
Photo by: Ed Aldridge

Edith Lake was named after Edith Judd (m. Edith Webster), the first white woman to travel to the lake.

Aldridge, Ed

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