Showing 262 results

Authority record

Barbour, Allan Newton

  • AB01
  • Person
  • September 3, 1869 - October 26, 1953

Allan Barbour was born in New Brunswick to Robert Barbour and ? Newton, both of Scotland. In the early 1900's, Allan and his brother Charlie came to the coast. He worked in the Fraser Valley for two years before the Barbour brothers came to Squamish in 1907. He homesteaded across from the current railway shops.

In 1915, Allan Barbour married Kathleen Boyle. The first of their four children was born in 1916 (Richard). Later on they had Howard, Kenneth, and Kathleen (Mrs Lacey).

Al Barbour retired in 1935 and he died later that year on October 26 at age 84.

Barnfield, Alfred Pinneger

  • AB02
  • Person
  • October 30, 1866 - September 24, 1960

Alfred was born in Wittshire, England to Edward and Ann (nee Pinnegar) Barnfield.

He was a preemptor on the Lillooet River and was one of nine men to clear, replace bridges, and improve the grade on the 60 mile Squamish-Pemberton trail (April - July 1891).

In 1897, he helped John Currie attempt to drive his animals over the Howe Sound trail. The drive was a great failure. During the summer of 1897, he explored for minerals down Lillooet Lake. In 1897 he went to Blackwater, or Birkenhead to explore for copper.

Alfred came to Squamish prior to 1905. His name ppears in the a Hotel register in 1903, however he states he is from Vancouver and later Green Lake. He later signs himself as coming from Squamish.

On August 1, 1910, he married Daisy Eck Hotchkiss and they went to England on their honeymoon. They lived at Alta Lake and had four children (Charles, Fred, William, and Vera). Their son Charles, born in 1920, died overseas.

In 1924 he moved to Squamish on Wilson Crescent. He had traded land at Alta Lake with the PGE.

Rose, Alice

  • AC01
  • Person

Alice was married to Charles Rose. Charles worked at the Squamish Valley Hop Co. hop ranch. Alice was the ranch cook. Charles built a log house alongside the slough by the hop ranch. In 1898 Charles became manager of the hop ranch.

In 1893, Alice became the first white woman to visit the lake that became her namesake (Alice Lake).

Jack, August

  • AJ01
  • Person
  • 1877 - June 14, 1967

Chief August Jack was a notable Squamish Indian who was an experienced Indian guide, trapper, logger, a talented canoe builder, and one of the last of the medicine men and traditional Indian dancers. In addition to this, he was also one of the last of the Squamish Indians to perform the "rituals of manhood" that qualify you as a true Indian brave. This involved a young man going into the mountains to fast and meditate until one was "visited by the spirit".

August Jack was born at the False Creek Indian Reserve of "Snauq" (c 1877), an area later called "Kitsilano" in honour o fhis grandfather (his father's father), Chief Khahtsahlanogh. August Jack was the son of Supple Jack ("Khay-Tulk" of Chaythoos) and Sally ("Owhaywat", who originally was from a village in Squamish). Old Chief Khahtsahlanogh had migrated from his ancestral home at Toktakamic on the Squamish River and settled at Chaythoos.

Supple Jack died the day August Jack was born. His mother remarried Shinatset (Jericho Charlie whose first wife's name was Menatlot for the first years of his life.

August Jack lived at the village of Snaq until the reserve land was bought by the government in 1913. He, along with many other Squamish Indians from this village, moved up to the reserve in Squamish. In Squamish, prior 1900, patronymic of his grandfather was conferred upon him and that of "Khaytulk" upon his brother Willie. He later moved back to Vancouver to the North Vancouver reserve where he became an honoured elder and skilled carver.

In 1938 he renounced the name Jack and became August Jack.

He married Swanamia (Mary Anne) and they would have 5 children: Emma, Celestine, Wilfred, Irene, and Louise. Louise now lives in the home in Squamish (Kowtain Reserve) that the band arranged for August Jack and Swanamia to move into in 1961. August Jack remained here until his death (June 14, 1967) at age 91.

Munro, Henry Alexander

  • AM01
  • Person
  • January 20, 1871 - June 13, 1950

Henry Alexander was born in Quebec to Alexander and Annie (nee Hudson), both of Quebec. He was married to Christina Mcleen Dunlop.

He came to Squamish in 1912 to repair the Newport Hotel. He decided to stay so his wife and 3 sons joined him 3 months later.

Henry Alexander carried on a freighting service, had a livery stable, and a blacksmith shop. He would also make coffins and dig graves. He founded the Squamish Fire Department. Beginning with a bucket brigade and developing it to a $10,000 investment. He was the fire chief right up until he retired a few months before his death. He also advocated for parks in Squamish.

In the 1920's, he logged at Birken. Then he returned to Squamish to frieght material for the Utopia Mine at Britannia by packhorse (Dray Business). In 1934, he was in the dray business for the Asloo Mines. He later began a packhorse service into Black Tusk Meadows of Garibaldi Park.

After his wife died, one of his sons, Alexander ("Young Alex"), died when a locomotive #53 plunged into Seton Lake on january 23, 1950. After he retired as a Fire Chief he was awarded a Good Citizenship medal in March 1950.

He died on June 15, 1950 at age 81.

Robertson, A.

  • AR01
  • Person

Mr and Mrs Robertson were the first white settlers in the Squamish Valley. They came from Manitoba to homestead on the banks of the Mamquam River. The area where they lived is in the current location of the industrial park.

In February 1889, their daughter Catherine and her husband Allen Rae came to Squamish. They had another daughter, Minerva, who would often visit her sister in Squamish.

Rae, Allen

  • AR01
  • Person

Allen Rae came from Scotland at age 21. He married Kate Robertson and they had a son (Oswald) and two daughters (Retta and Minnie). Minnie was born on January 17, 1888. The family left their farm in Manitoba as the wheat froze each winter. They came to Squamish in February 1889 where Kate's parents had alrady pre-empted. Allen hoped to find gold. They pre-empted near the present day railway shops.

Allen and Kate had seven more sons in Squamish: Thomas Edgar was the first white child to be born in the Squamish Valley (March 8, 1889), Wilfred (1891), Robert Stewart (1893), Herbert Lawson (June 15, 1894), Maurice (1896), Lawrence Johnson (1900), and Jimmie (around 1902).

Allen joined the hop industry around 1894. He grew hops in an area now known as North Yards. The farm would be 160 acres and was separated in 1921 when the Mamquam River changed its course.

In 1904, Allen sold 20 acres of land to Jimmy Neil.

Allen died when he was blasting stumps on his farm. He did not wait long enough after he thought the fuse had gone out.

The house near the railway shops was destroyed by a flood in 1908.

Memorial: Rae Creek.

Buckley, Brian

  • BB03
  • Person
  • October 20, 1930 -

Brian Buckley was born in Vancouver to Frank and Doris Buckley. His eldest brother, David Franklin, died in Squamish on August 30, 1932. His other brother is Kenneth Allen Buckley.

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