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Judd, Earl Thomas

  • EJ01
  • Personne
  • March 6, 1898 - June 1, 1969

Earl Thomas was born to Henry and Barbara Anne (nee Edwards) Judd in Vancouver. When he was 6 weeks gold, he got bronchial pneumonia (April 1898). He was so ill that his parents brought him to Vancouver in a Dug-out canoe on a stormy night.

In 1913 he hauled a steam donkey on the Squamish River 2 miles above the Cheekye with Jimmy Neil.

He married Gweyneth Grey Griffith (born in Clysach, Wales on June 11, 1900 to John Phillip and Gertrude Maude Grey). They had two children: Gwenyth E. (Mrs Bruce Kingham) and Phillip H. (wife named Betty).

Earl Thomas cut wood for the steam donkey used by Stoltz Logging from 1937 to 1940.

His died in Squamish at age 61 on March 23, 1962. He died at age 71 on June 1, 1969.

Webster, Olive

  • OJ01
  • Personne
  • September 27, 1895 - April 8, 1964

Born to Henry and Barbara Anne (nee Edwards) Judd.

Olive married William Webster in 1925. He was a baker and then worked in a dairy. He later lived on a soldier's pension after being wounded in World War I. He had been a member of the 72nd Highlanders.

Olive and William and two children: Thomas and Barbara Langstaff.

William died around 1950. Olive died at age 68 on April 8, 1964.

Mills, Catherine (Kate)

  • KM01
  • Personne

Kate Robertson married Allen Rae who had come to Canada from Scotland at age 21. They had a son (Oswald) and two daughters (Retta and Minnie). Minnie was born on January 17, 1888. The family left their farm in Manitoba as the wheat froze each winter. They came to Squamish in February 1889 where Kate's parents had alrady pre-empted. Allen hoped to find gold. They pre-empted near the present day railway shops.

Kate and Allen had seven more sons in Squamish: Thomas Edgar was the first white child to be born in the Squamish Valley (March 8, 1889), Wilfred (1891), Robert Stewart (1893), Herbert Lawson (June 15, 1894), Maurice (1896), Lawrence Johnson (1900), and Jimmie (around 1902).

Allen joined the hop industry around 1894. He grew hops in an area now known as North Yards. The farm would be 160 acres and was separated in 1921 when the Mamquam River changed its course. In 1904, Allen sold 20 acres of land to Jimmy Neil.

Allen died when he was blasting stumps on his farm. He did not wait long enough after he thought the fuse had gone out. The house near the railway shops was destroyed by a flood in 1908.

Around 1910, Kate bought a boarding house beside the Bracken Arms for the men working on the Howe Sound Northern Railway. The Lews, and then the Armstrongs were the successive owners.

Kate married Hugh Henry Mills in 1912. They lived in the house where Norm Halvorson later lived in 1984.

Rae, Maurice

  • MR01
  • Personne
  • 1896 - October 18, 1951

Maurice was born to Allen and Kate Rae. He fought in World War I in 1918. He later worked for a transfer unit, on the culvert gang at the PGE, and as a gas mechanic for PGE.

Maurice married Hilda Magee in 1940. They had oen child, Margaretta Rae.

It was rumoured that when he drove a taxi in Squamish, he didn't have a driver's license. Maurice lived in Squamish his whole life.

Rae, Oswald (Ozzie)

  • OR01
  • Personne
  • 188? - ~1920

Oswald was born prior to 1888 as the oldest child of Allen and Kate Rae. He came to Squamish with his parents in February 1889.

Oswald married Doris Thorne around 1916. They had 4 children: Marjorie, Catherine, Irene (died) and Allan. He died in his early 30's.

Rae, Robert Stewart (Bert)

  • RR01
  • Personne
  • 1893 - April 14, 1978

Bert was born in 1893 to Allen and Kate Rae.

In 1913, he worked as a faller for Laviolette, McIntyre, and Levesque ("The French Boys"). In 1926, he was a hooktender at Craig and Taylor logging operation in Cheekye. He was also a trapper on Round Mountain.

Robert married Jessie Judd on December 27, 1927. They had three children: Stewart James (Jimmy) on June 5, 1929; Catherine Anne (Anne, to be Mrs D.W. Davison) on September 15, 1933;, and Harry Stewart on January 27, 1935.

Bert worked at Woodfibre. Jane started working at Woodfibre as well in December 1943. Bert left his work at Woodfibre in 1950.

Bert got in a car accident at the entrance to Squamish in 1977. He died of complications from the car accident at age 86 on April 14, 1978. Harry died in 1981.

Robertson, A.

  • AR01
  • Personne

Mr and Mrs Robertson were the first white settlers in the Squamish Valley. They came from Manitoba to homestead on the banks of the Mamquam River. The area where they lived is in the current location of the industrial park.

In February 1889, their daughter Catherine and her husband Allen Rae came to Squamish. They had another daughter, Minerva, who would often visit her sister in Squamish.

Rose, Alice

  • AC01
  • Personne

Alice was married to Charles Rose. Charles worked at the Squamish Valley Hop Co. hop ranch. Alice was the ranch cook. Charles built a log house alongside the slough by the hop ranch. In 1898 Charles became manager of the hop ranch.

In 1893, Alice became the first white woman to visit the lake that became her namesake (Alice Lake).

Eadie, James Stafford

  • JE01
  • Personne
  • December 16, 1885 - December 31, 1983

James was born in Glen Mavis, Midlothian, Scotland. He grew up in Scotland with 8 brothers and 1 sister. On March 26, 1910, he left Bathgate, Scotland and boarded the "Cassandria". He arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia on April 7, 1910. On April 13, 1910, he arrived in Vancouver by train. He worked in the coal mines in Nanaimo.

On December 28, 1916, he married Janet (born in Glasgow on August 19, 1894) at the Nanaimo Methodist Church. They had 3 children: Fred, James, and Mrs Marion Bochon.

In 1917, James came to Squamish to work for the PGE. He started as a "wiper", cleaning engines. He also worked as a fireman. He retired from the railway in 1952 after being an engineer for 35 years.

He built a home at 37789 Cleveland Avenue. His son Fred died.

On May 20, 1977, he took part in inaugural run celebrations for the Royal Hudson with Mayor Pat Brennan and Honourable Grace McCarthy.

His wife Janet died in June 1981. He died during one of his trips to Prince George to visit his son James and his sixth great grandchild in December 1983.

Mackenzie, Roderick

  • RM02
  • Personne
  • January 5, 1868 - April 29, 1957

Roderick Mackenzie was born in Scotland. He was the son of Murdo Mackenzie.

Around 1899, he served with the Highland Regiment in South Africa during the Boer War. He was a close friend of Indian leader, Mahatma Ghandi. He sold goods by ox-cart in anti-British sectors of South Africa.

Roderick married Elizabeth Maclagan and settled in North America in 1908. In 1912, he came to the "boom town" of Squamish and bought a lot on Cleveland Avenue (in the later location of the IGA parking lot) for $2000. On this land he established a men's clothing store in partnership with Bob Fraser. This was the first of his department store chain. When the land boom ended, he purchased the adjoining lot for $50. The store completely burned down in 1917. Roderick purchased the building across the street and started to rebuild on the old store's site.

In 1918, Roderick opened a store in Williams Lake. He would later live in Williams Lake for many years becoming a charter member of the Board Trade, a prominent member of the Masonic Lodge and chairman of the War Memorial Hospital there.

Roderick later bought out Lake's store (located where the IGA would later be) that sold groceries and clothing. He returned to his rebuilt store when the man who owned the Lake's property raised the rent. He added a lean-to to the old store in order to include a grocery department. He later returned to the site of the Lake's store as the owner.

In 1921, his business in Williams Lake burned down. It was later rebuilt.

In 1928, he represented the Cariboo in the Provincial Legislature from 1928 to 1932. He became known as the "Laird of the Cariboo".

His store opened in Wells in the 1930's. During the floods in Squamish, Mackenzies' always provided supplies of ready to eat foods for the town's flood victims. He helped the war effort in 1944 by producing carloads of hogs for export. His ranch was the old Squamish Valley Hop Company ranch.

The Wells store closed in 1951 and Roderick added fifty feet to the store on Cleveland Avenue.

In 1954, Roderick's son, Alistair, took over the Squamish store.

Roderick's wife died in March 1957. Roderick died at 89 years of age on April 29, 1957.

The Mackenzies Shopping Center closed on March 16, 1966. It had been run by Roderick's son, Alistair. The store was later replaced by the IGA.

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