Showing 259 results

Authority record

Lamport, Charles Edgar

  • CL01
  • Person
  • 1881 - 1968

Charles was born in Port Heron, Ontario. He married Maude Colliday in Flint Michigan (Maudes' hometown) on August 16, 1904. They homesteaded near Hanley, Saskatchewan.

In 1912, they left Saskatchewan. They stayed in Portland, Oregon until they located a home in Squamish. In 1913, Charles came to Squamish with his wife and three daughers: Thelma (Mrs S. Murphy), Sylvia (Mrs A. Musto), and Evelyn (Mrs W. Malm). In Squamish, their other children were born: Alta (Mrs J.E. Aldridge), Vera (Mrs J. Gulewich), Frances (Mrs A.L Pierce), Russel, Aileen (Mrs Hagglund), Esther (Mrs G. Audet), and Mavis Lamport. Betty (Mrs D. Stewart), the 2nd youngest, was born in Vancouver.

Mavis drawned in 1944 at 19 years of age.

Charles retired from the railway at age 65. Mrs Lamport died at age 81 on December 30, 1966 and Charles died in 1968 at 87 years.

Judd, William Henry

  • WJ01
  • Person
  • March 1, 1897 - January 1919

William Henry was born to Henry and Barbara Anne (nee Edwards) Judd.

William Henry joined the army around 1917 after the fire at the Judd house. He was later discharged from the army. After he came home he got the Asian flu. He was sick for one week and died in January 1919.

Judd, Thomas Wilby

  • TJ01
  • Person
  • December 7, 1875 - March 7, 1961

Born to Thomas (of England) and Nancy Almira (nee Read of Ontario) Judd. Thomas Wilby came to Squamish with his parents and sister Rilla in 1892. He lived with his brother Henry (Harry).

In 1894, Thomas was the best man for his sister Marilla's marriage to Jim Edwards. He himself remained a bachelor.

In 1913, Thomas partnered with Kenneth Dondale in the Howe Sound Realty Co. Squamish was then known as Newport and was experiencing a landboom. He lived in a cabin he had built on Shadow Lake (in the general area of Alpine Lodge). He was forced to move when BC Hudro flooded for the construction of Daisy Laje Dam. He moved to Cheakamus where he had a fntastic rock garden.

Judd, Henry (Harry)

  • HJ01
  • Person
  • March 25, 1870 - February 3, 1952

Henry Judd was born to Thomas (of England) and Nancy (of Ontario), nee Reed. He came to Vancouver from Ontario by rail in 1889 and stayed with cousin Ozzie Wood. He wanted to farm and almost went to Bonapart Rally but his cousin was interested in Squamish.

On November 12, 1889, Henry started for Squamish on the S.S. Saturna with Bown, Simpson, Sutherland, Crawford, Creelman, and his cousin Wood. He was 19 years old at the time. He reached hsi claim on the mouth of the Squamish River on November 14, 1889. With his partners Creelman and Wood, he built a lean-to. The others had given up before reaching their claim. The area he pre-empted was later occupied by the Brennans. He had originally drawn a lot at the mouth of the Cheakamus River but did not like it. Judd, Creland, and Wood moved into a crude 10' x 12' log house that they built on November 22, 1889.

On December 20, 1889, he started out for Vancouver. The Indians were supposed to take them dwon the river but they were a week late; by this time Judd had already built a dug-out canoe. He stayed with his aunt in Vancouver that winter.

In 1890 he returned to Ontario to convince his parents to come to Squamish. This was the only time he ever returned to Ontario. Judd, his cousin A.H. (Bert) Crysler, H. Drummond, and E.G. Baynes started out for Squamish in a boat Judd and Crysler had built.

On May 3, 1890, Judd completed building a house on the property that would later be belong to the Brennans. Judd was joined by his parents, Mr and Mrs Thomas Judd, his sister Rilla, and his brother Wilby in 1892. By this time Harry had built an addition onto his home for them. On December 5, 1894 all the settlers turned out to help Judd raise his new log house which was 18' x 24' and a storey and a half high. Judd's parents, brother, and sister would remain in the houseon the Brennan property.

Henry Judd was engaged to Barbara Anne Edwards soonafter meeting her at a party at Mr Mashiter's. H.J. Edwards, Barbara Anne's brother brought up lumber for Harry Judd's new home (the current Farquharson place on Judd Road). On December 26, 1894, Henry Judd married Barbara Anne Edwards in Vancouver. The Bridesmaid was the bride's sister Mrs T.K. Bogart. They returned to Squamish the next day.

Olive, the first of 8 girls was born on September 27, 1895. Henry and Barbara Anne had 10 children in total: William Henry on March 1, 1897; Earl Thomas on March 6, 1898; Edith in 1900; Gertrude Ruth on April 21, 1902; Jessie on November 23, 1903; Myrtle in 1906; twins Jane and Clara on October 5, 1909; and Dorothy on April 7, 1913.

The Judd home was enlarged between 1909 and 1910. It burned down in January 1916 and was later rebuilt. It is now the home of his daughter Dorothy and her husband Mr R.E. Farquharson.

Henry's father, Thomas Judd died of a prostate problem in 1910. Henry Judd died at age 82 on February 3, 1952. Mrs Henry Judd died in Lynn Valley on December 16, 1968 at age 94.

Judd, Earl Thomas

  • EJ01
  • Person
  • March 6, 1898 - June 1, 1969

Earl Thomas was born to Henry and Barbara Anne (nee Edwards) Judd in Vancouver. When he was 6 weeks gold, he got bronchial pneumonia (April 1898). He was so ill that his parents brought him to Vancouver in a Dug-out canoe on a stormy night.

In 1913 he hauled a steam donkey on the Squamish River 2 miles above the Cheekye with Jimmy Neil.

He married Gweyneth Grey Griffith (born in Clysach, Wales on June 11, 1900 to John Phillip and Gertrude Maude Grey). They had two children: Gwenyth E. (Mrs Bruce Kingham) and Phillip H. (wife named Betty).

Earl Thomas cut wood for the steam donkey used by Stoltz Logging from 1937 to 1940.

His died in Squamish at age 61 on March 23, 1962. He died at age 71 on June 1, 1969.

Judd, Barbara Anne

  • BJ01
  • Person
  • April 3, 1873 - December 16, 1967

Barbara Annie was born on April 3, 1873 to William and Mary (nee Tompkins) Edwards in Gore Bay, Ontario. His brother was Jack Edwards.

In 1888, she came to Vancouver with her parents by rail at age 15. They got off at Fort Langley. She came to Squamish in 1894 with Mr and Mrs Charles Rose who were working at the Squamish Valley Hop Company Ranch.

She married Henry Judd on December 26, 1894. They met at a party at Mr Mashiter's house.

See "Henry Judd" for more information.

Jimmy, Jimmy

  • JJ01
  • Person

Jimmy Jimmy (Indian name-Swahsh) and his wife lived quite far up the Squamish river; past Baynes Island and a little farther up past the end of Judd Slough. He claimed that he was chosen to present a gift of Indian baskets on behalf of the Squamish Indians to Prince Edward (who later became King Edward, but abdicated) in the late 1800's. Jimmy Jimmy was very pockmarked from his bout with smallpox.

His wife was quite a character. Wherever she went, she carried her chamber pot with her. Whenever she rode in Mr Judd's "taxi service", he knew he would have to stop and let her out somewhere along the trip.

Account of Chief Jimmy Jimmy from Ta Kaya (Lone Wolf) [I Remember, page 9]: No one knew his age. When asked his age, he always said "seventy snows", meaning seventy years. He must have been nearly a hundred years old when he passed away. When his eyes started to fail, he had to hang up his rifle and use his shotgun loaded with buckshot to get a deer. After a few years, I really felt sorry for Jimmy. He came and told me that his eyes had failed him completely and that he couldn't see a deer more than forty feet so had to quit hunting. A few of us always shared our meat with him. He never had any children of his own to carry on his skills.
[Page 30] He was noted as the best canoe man that we ever had on the Squamish River. He had a large thirty-three foot dugout canoe that he made himself. He charged ten dollars a day for himself and the canoe to carry freight on the river and charged extra for any help he needed. A day then was from daylight until dark.

Jack, August

  • AJ01
  • Person
  • 1877 - June 14, 1967

Chief August Jack was a notable Squamish Indian who was an experienced Indian guide, trapper, logger, a talented canoe builder, and one of the last of the medicine men and traditional Indian dancers. In addition to this, he was also one of the last of the Squamish Indians to perform the "rituals of manhood" that qualify you as a true Indian brave. This involved a young man going into the mountains to fast and meditate until one was "visited by the spirit".

August Jack was born at the False Creek Indian Reserve of "Snauq" (c 1877), an area later called "Kitsilano" in honour o fhis grandfather (his father's father), Chief Khahtsahlanogh. August Jack was the son of Supple Jack ("Khay-Tulk" of Chaythoos) and Sally ("Owhaywat", who originally was from a village in Squamish). Old Chief Khahtsahlanogh had migrated from his ancestral home at Toktakamic on the Squamish River and settled at Chaythoos.

Supple Jack died the day August Jack was born. His mother remarried Shinatset (Jericho Charlie whose first wife's name was Menatlot for the first years of his life.

August Jack lived at the village of Snaq until the reserve land was bought by the government in 1913. He, along with many other Squamish Indians from this village, moved up to the reserve in Squamish. In Squamish, prior 1900, patronymic of his grandfather was conferred upon him and that of "Khaytulk" upon his brother Willie. He later moved back to Vancouver to the North Vancouver reserve where he became an honoured elder and skilled carver.

In 1938 he renounced the name Jack and became August Jack.

He married Swanamia (Mary Anne) and they would have 5 children: Emma, Celestine, Wilfred, Irene, and Louise. Louise now lives in the home in Squamish (Kowtain Reserve) that the band arranged for August Jack and Swanamia to move into in 1961. August Jack remained here until his death (June 14, 1967) at age 91.

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