Showing 259 results

Authority record

Edwards, Jim

  • JE01
  • Person

Jim was born to William and Mary (nee Tompkins) Edwards.

He arrived in Squamish in 1894 on the Saturna. He brought lumber up for Henry Judd's new home. Judd was about to marry Jim's sister, Barbara Anne.

Harry Judd married Barbara Anne Edwards in Vancouver on December 26, 1894. Later in 1904, Jim married Rilla Judd (Harry's sister). This was the first white marriage in the Squamish Valley and took at the bride's home. The bridesmaid was Martha Wright (daughter of school teacher John Wright). The best man was Wilby Judd (Rilla's brother). They had 3 daughters, in order of age: Ethel, Edith, and Nina (changed her name to Merna when she was about 30).

Jim's brother, Jack, came to Squamish in 1908 with his wife. They had come from Manitionlin Island, Ontario. His wife's maiden name was Elizabeth Hawkins.

Brohm, William

  • WB01
  • Person

William was born in Germany. He moved near Cheakamus around 1894. He brought his daughter from Germany and she would later marry Johnny Smedley.

He built the Mashiter house around 1902.

Memorials: Brohm Creek, Brohm Lake, Brohm Ridge.

Bracken, John

  • JB01
  • Person

John Bracken was born in England. He came to Squamish in 1905 with his two sons, Richard and Lance. He was a remittance man.

In Squamish he built an "everything" store and a post office. He was the first postmaster in Brackendale.

He built the Bracken Arms, a hotel with a store and a post office prior to 1908. It was located on the East side of Government Road, south of the present Brackendale store. He used to fine people 25 cents for learning back and resting a chair on its two back legs.

In Spring 1912, the Bracken Arms Hotel burned down when a patron in an upstairs room overturned a coal lamp. The chimney was all that ws left standing.

Baynes, Edgar George

  • EB01
  • Person
  • 1870 - November 5, 1956

Edgar Baynes was born to Harriet Amelia and George Baynes on Fens Farm in Brocking, Essex England. He had 5 brothers and sisters: Hetty, Kate, Alfred, Jim, and Lila. He and his family moved to Stisted Hall, Essex in 1874 and were educated at Braintree Board School.

Edgar ran away from home in 1883 and joined a firm of builders in 1884. He spent 5 years learning the building trade.

On April 4, 1889, he left for Liverpool on the S.S. Sarnia for Halifax as an apprentice to Mr Joseph Franklin. He arrived in Halifax on the 14th, took a train to Vancouver, and arrived in Vancouver on the 22nd.

On March 7, 1890, he left for Squamish from Vancouver at age 19 with his friends Harry Judd and A.J. (Bert) Crysler and their friend Drummond. They left in a sailboat that Crysler and Judd had made. He pre-empted on an island in the Squamish River, now known as Baynes Island (in the area of an Indian graveyard).

In 1892, Edgar left Squamish to become a carpenter in Vancouver. During his time he placed long firm beams in the Christ Church Cathedral.

In 1893, he established Baynes and Horie Construction Company with William Horie. The office was in the Baynes house at 634 East Georgia. They would build many of the early buildings on Water and Cordova Streets and more schools than any other contractor in the province. His company also got a contract to erect Entrance Island Lighthouse near Nanaimo (paid $2308).

On April 15, 1899, he married Margaret Anderson McAlpine in First Presbyterian Church at Gore and Hastings. She was born at Lindsay, Ontario in 1874 and came to BC in 1889.

In 1901, he took a trip back to England to see his family. His first two children, Doris Lillian (Mrs Ewart Woolliams) and Jean Hetty (Mrs Alan King) were born between 1901 and 1905.

In 1906, Edgar organized and became president of Port Haney Brick Company. His family moved from West Pender to Fairview (1200 West Broadway) to a house he had built. His other children, Ted and Margaret (Mrs Harry Cannon) were born here.

By 1907, Baynes and Will Horie owned Hany Brick Co. which would continue to run for 70 years (the only brick company in BC to do so). They supplied drain tile for the Fraser Valley and partition tile for the larger buildings in the province. It ceased production in July 1977.

Baynes and Horie built the factory building for Canadian Carbonated Co. from 1909 to 1910. In 1913, he built Grosvenor Hotel (840 Howe). He had to take over ownership himself during the depression that preceded World War I. He was the largest shareholder and operated it until his death. His family continued to manage it until 1973 when it was sold to Dutch family interests.

In 1925, he built the Douglas Lodge on Stewart Lake at Fort St. James and operated it for many years.

In 1946, Edgar was involved in a scandal where $28,000 was missing from the books at Grosvenor Hotel. Baynes charged his accountant Frederick Denis Whyte with theft. Whyte accused his employer of ordering him to "fix the books".

He died at age 86 in 1956. Mrs Baynes donated the house at 1200 West Broadway to the YMCA. The gift included 100 feet of land on Broadway and 125 feet on Alder. The YCMA bought an additional 50 feet on Broadway in 1968 for $28,000. This was used as a home for teenage girls and a cooperative for single parents. It was also Vancouver's first Indian center (1963), a day center housing Dutch immigrant families, and as a temporary main YWCA headquarter. The terms of the gift was that the YWCA had to keep the house for 20 years. It was used. In 1977 the house sold for $650,000. The money was used to help finance YWCA programs.

Mrs Baynes died in 1967. She had been living in the Arbutus Private Hosital.

Barnfield, Alfred Pinneger

  • AB02
  • Person
  • October 30, 1866 - September 24, 1960

Alfred was born in Wittshire, England to Edward and Ann (nee Pinnegar) Barnfield.

He was a preemptor on the Lillooet River and was one of nine men to clear, replace bridges, and improve the grade on the 60 mile Squamish-Pemberton trail (April - July 1891).

In 1897, he helped John Currie attempt to drive his animals over the Howe Sound trail. The drive was a great failure. During the summer of 1897, he explored for minerals down Lillooet Lake. In 1897 he went to Blackwater, or Birkenhead to explore for copper.

Alfred came to Squamish prior to 1905. His name ppears in the a Hotel register in 1903, however he states he is from Vancouver and later Green Lake. He later signs himself as coming from Squamish.

On August 1, 1910, he married Daisy Eck Hotchkiss and they went to England on their honeymoon. They lived at Alta Lake and had four children (Charles, Fred, William, and Vera). Their son Charles, born in 1920, died overseas.

In 1924 he moved to Squamish on Wilson Crescent. He had traded land at Alta Lake with the PGE.

Barbour, Kathleen

  • KB01
  • Person
  • 1889 - January 11, 1974

Kathleen Boyle was born in Waterford, Ireland as a direct descendant of Sir Richard Boyle, the first Earl of Cork whose son, Robert Boyle, became world famous Irish philosopher acclaimed as the "Father of Chemistry".

She arrived in Canada aboard the Virginian (one of the ships called to aid the Titanic). She lived in Vancouver for a short time and then moved to Squamish. In 1915, she met and married Allan Barbour. Together they had 4 children: Ken, Richard, Howard, and Kathleen (Mrs Lacey).

In 1930, Kathleen and her husband moved to Kerrisdale where she served 3 terms as president of the Women's Auxiliary of the Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 30. They lived near St. Mary's Church.

Her husband died on October 26, 1953 and she died at age 83 on January 11, 1974.

Barbour, Allan Newton

  • AB01
  • Person
  • September 3, 1869 - October 26, 1953

Allan Barbour was born in New Brunswick to Robert Barbour and ? Newton, both of Scotland. In the early 1900's, Allan and his brother Charlie came to the coast. He worked in the Fraser Valley for two years before the Barbour brothers came to Squamish in 1907. He homesteaded across from the current railway shops.

In 1915, Allan Barbour married Kathleen Boyle. The first of their four children was born in 1916 (Richard). Later on they had Howard, Kenneth, and Kathleen (Mrs Lacey).

Al Barbour retired in 1935 and he died later that year on October 26 at age 84.

Barbour, Charles

  • CB01
  • Person
  • 18?? - July 1, 1940

Charles Barbour was born in New Brunswick to Robert Barbour and ? Newton (both originally of Scotland). His stepdaughter Beebe Fowles (would be Mrs Ruddock) was born on August 16, 1895. He later married Dora Woodward.

In 1900, he came to the west coast with his brother Allan. They would own logging operations together in Squamish.

His family came to Squamish in 1901. Charlie Woodworth Barbour was born on January 27, 1905. On May 24, 1906, he brought his wife and stepdaughter up the Pemberton trail by horseback (they had come to Squamish on the Defiance). He had bought land from Sylyanus Pettit. It was reported that Dora and Beebe were the first white woman and child to go up that trail.

In 1907, he came to Squamish with his brother Allan to log. On March 26, 1907, Reba Alexandra (would be Mrs Johnson) was born.

Charles Barbour later lived in Vancouver while the Barbour home in Pemberton was used as a stopping house, first by the Bauers, and then by McLauchlan (Charles Barbour's nephew).

In 1913 he returned to Pemberton with his family.

Jack, August

  • AJ01
  • Person
  • 1877 - June 14, 1967

Chief August Jack was a notable Squamish Indian who was an experienced Indian guide, trapper, logger, a talented canoe builder, and one of the last of the medicine men and traditional Indian dancers. In addition to this, he was also one of the last of the Squamish Indians to perform the "rituals of manhood" that qualify you as a true Indian brave. This involved a young man going into the mountains to fast and meditate until one was "visited by the spirit".

August Jack was born at the False Creek Indian Reserve of "Snauq" (c 1877), an area later called "Kitsilano" in honour o fhis grandfather (his father's father), Chief Khahtsahlanogh. August Jack was the son of Supple Jack ("Khay-Tulk" of Chaythoos) and Sally ("Owhaywat", who originally was from a village in Squamish). Old Chief Khahtsahlanogh had migrated from his ancestral home at Toktakamic on the Squamish River and settled at Chaythoos.

Supple Jack died the day August Jack was born. His mother remarried Shinatset (Jericho Charlie whose first wife's name was Menatlot for the first years of his life.

August Jack lived at the village of Snaq until the reserve land was bought by the government in 1913. He, along with many other Squamish Indians from this village, moved up to the reserve in Squamish. In Squamish, prior 1900, patronymic of his grandfather was conferred upon him and that of "Khaytulk" upon his brother Willie. He later moved back to Vancouver to the North Vancouver reserve where he became an honoured elder and skilled carver.

In 1938 he renounced the name Jack and became August Jack.

He married Swanamia (Mary Anne) and they would have 5 children: Emma, Celestine, Wilfred, Irene, and Louise. Louise now lives in the home in Squamish (Kowtain Reserve) that the band arranged for August Jack and Swanamia to move into in 1961. August Jack remained here until his death (June 14, 1967) at age 91.

Douglas, Charlie

  • CD01
  • Person

An "old-timer" who lived at the K-YAU-tain reserve in the early 1900's.

Charlie Douglas is Ernie Harry's grandfather. He lived at this reserve and worked as a logger for Al Barbour.

MacDonald, Scott

  • SM01
  • Person
  • 1897 -

Scott MacDonald was born in 1897 30 miles outside of Halifax in Nova Scotia. In 1912, he arrived in Squamish with his parents Duncan and Isobel MacDonald and his three brothers Alex, John, and Allen. In 1915 his forth brother Norman was born. They settled where Jimmie Niel's farm was.

In 1913 he was hired as a faller for the "French Boys". He would also be a high rigger at various logging camps and work for public works building a road to Upper Squamish.

On December 23, 1926 he married Mildred Schoonover and they lived in the PGE shop houses. He worked for the PGE as a trainman from 1928 to 1926 when he retired after 28 years of service. Scott and Mildred have also lived in the Schoonover's log cabin and 38890 Bowen Avenue.

Habricht, Jack

  • JH01
  • Person
  • 1875 - August 2, 1930

Jack Habricht was born in Poland in 1875. He came to Canada in the late 1890's and worked on the Skeena River Boats and Grant Trunk Pacific Line.

In 1896 he came to Squamish. He lived in a cabin at the base of Hospital Hill (above Merrill and Ring Campsite). Jack trapped and prospected in Squamish and the Indian River area. He also had a mining property by Goat Creek.

Jack shot himself and died on August 2, 1950. Habricht Mountain is named after him.

Brightbill, Harry

  • HB01
  • Person
  • 1891 - September 24, 1976

In 1911, Harry Brightbill came to Squamish to work for Norton and McKinnon, a logging company operating at Cheekeye. In 1913 he worked as a brakeman on the Howe Sound and Pemberton Valley Northern Railway.

In the 1920's, Harry married Kamloops-born Jean Greatrix. They had 3 daughters, Alma (Mrs A.H. Cunningham), Katherine (Mrs W.A. Johnson), and Harriet.

His wife died at age 66 on June 9, 1965. Harry died on September 24, 1976 shortly after receiving an award for the best garden in Squamish Valley.

Green, Walter

  • WG01
  • Person
  • May 25, 1882 -

Walter Green was born in Watertown, Ontario. His mother died and he lived with his grandparents Mr and Mrs Richard Carey on their farm near Hamilton. In 1888 he moved near Guelph and lived with an aunt and uncle, Mr and Mrs J.C. Williams who ran a post office and a small store. He began schooling in stone schoolhouse in Beach Grove.

In 1899 he moved to Vancouver with his aunt and uncle. He worked as an office boy for the Vancouver Province (owned by W.C. Nichol) and worked his way up to bookkeeper. He began work for Vancouver World in 1904 which L.D. Taylor had just bought. In 1905 he moved to North Vancouver and worked as a reporter for the North Shore Press.

In 1907 Walter married Margaret Mee of North Vancouver. They had 4 children: Mrs Lynn Gowan, Mrs Bertha (Bussie) Pomeroy, Mrs Ann Helmer, and Richard (born 1917).

In 1920, Walter moved to Pemberton. He bought a farm and built a house. He grew government certified seed potatoes that would become an original member of Pemberton Seed Potato Growers Group. His farm was almost destroyed in a flood which resulted in him having to farm in Surrey. He also moved to a rented farm in Delta and later moved back to the Perbton Valley when the area received flood protection.

In the 1960s, Walter retired from active farming but still farmed for himself.

His wife Margaret who was a founding member of the Pemberton Women's Institute died at age 90. His son Richard died at age 62 in 1979. His daughter Bertha lived with him in Pemberton until 1984 when he began to reside in Squamish General Hospital.

Downer, Fred

  • FD01
  • Person
  • March 7, 1884 - May 26, 1983

Born in Chilchester, Sussex, Fred came to Canada in 1904 to Barrier (Ontario) to join a friend who had emigrated earlier. He was an apprentice to a photographer, worked on a farm, worked for Grand Trunk Railway out of Brarier, harvested wheat in the Winnipeg area, and worked for the Canadian Northern Railway. He also went to North Dakota.

He went to Moose Jaw and then to a grading camp east of Medicine Hat. Then he worked in Fort McLeod loading coal for the CPR. Fred also spent two years in Moyie (west of Crabbrook) working as an electrician's helper. He latser worked for the Canadian National Railway in Ontario. After his brother came from England, he built a houseboat with him.

Fred arrived in Squamish on May 1, 1910 to work for teh railway. He had come from the Rainy River division of the Canadian Northern where he was a fireman. He drove the "One-Spot" as the first engineer for the Howe Sound and Pemberton Valley Northern Railway. He was also an engineer for teh "Two-Spot" (now in Clarke Park) when the HS&PVN railway became the Pacific Great Eastern. He later left Squamish to work as an engineer in North Vancouver.

In 1912 Fred married a native girl in North Vancouver. They had 7 children, 4 boys and 3 girls. They lived on a float house in the Blind Channel in Squamish. During this time he fought fires in Upper Squamish.

In 1929 Fred quit when he was told that he would have to upgrade his skills in order to operate a work train instead of a logging train.

His wife died in 1933. His son Buzz died on November 6, 1972. He was survived by his wife Hazel and children Don, Maureen, and Richard.

In 1973 Fred moved to the Cedars. He passed away on May 26, 1983 in his 99th year.

Philip, Myrtle

  • MP01
  • Person
  • 1891 - 1986

Myrtle Philip is Whistler Valley’s most significant female pioneer. Born in the Eastern United States in 1891, Myrtle migrated to the west coast of British Columbia in her early twenties with her husband Alex Philip.

The couple fell in love with British Columbia’s Coast Mountains and decided to carry out their dream of building a holiday retreat. With the guidance of an old trapper, the Philips travelled north of Vancouver up the Pemberton Trail to a place called Alta Lake. Adventurous hiking, fishing, and fresh mountain air soon made the Lodge the most popular resort destination west of the Rocky Mountains. Guests participated in a number of outdoor activities such as horseback riding, swimming, boating, hunting, skiing and skating.

MacDonald, Mildred

  • MM01
  • Person
  • January 3, 1902 -

Born in Pennsylvannia to Charles and Elvira (nee Bump) Schoonover, Mildred's family moved a tiny cabin to Upper Squamish (opposite the BC Hydro power house) on 156 acres. She had an elder sister Mary who stayed with her grandparents in Pennsylvannia until she joined the family in Squamish in 1914, later becoming Mrs Bruce Wright. Her younger brother Robert was born in Squamish 1905 and was delivered by an Indian woman.

Mildred married Scott MacDonald on December 23, 1926 and they lived in the PGE shop houses. Scott MacDonald worked for the PGE as a trainman from 1928 to 1926 when he retired after 28 years of service. Scott and Mildred have also lived in the Schoonover's log cabin and 38890 Bowen Avenue.

Schoonover, Elvira

  • ES01
  • Person
  • January 7, 1877 - April 15, 1958

Born in New York City, Elvira Bump's family moved to Pennsylvannia where she met and married Charles Sherman Schoonover (1897). In 1898 they homesteaded in North Dakota and later pre-empted in Upper Squamish in October 1905.

Elvira and Charles Schoonover had two daughters, Mary and Mildred. Mary stayed with her grandparents in Pennsylvannia while Mildred moved to Squamish with them. In 1905 their son Robert was born in Squamish and delivered by an Indian woman. In 1908 the Schoonovers moved to Brackendale. Elvira's daughter Mary moved to Squamish in 1914 and later became Mrs Bruce Wright.

In 1932, the Schoonovers moved to a log cabin north of the Brackendale store. Elvira died in 1958 in Victoria, BC; her husband in 1950 at age 76.

Halvorson, Lynette

  • LH01
  • Person
  • 1935 - present

Lynette Munro was born to Freda Clark (Munro nee Lasser) and Alex Munro, a train engineer who was killed around 1951 when the train engine went into Seton Lake one winter. She has an older brother Dan, a Navy officer, and a younger brother Richard, a railway engineer on the Pacific Great Eastern.

Lynette finished high school and took her nurses training in Vancouver and then returned to Squamish and married Norman Halvorson. She worked for a very short time at the hospital in Squamish before her first child Don was born. She and Norm have four children: Don, Wendy, Paul, and Nancy.

McNeil, Rose

  • RM01
  • Person
  • April 9, 1884 - June 3, 1970

Born Rose Emma Wotruba.

In 1907, Rose pre-empted a homestead on the Cheekeye River with husband, J.B. Tatlow and children Clarence (Hank) and Agnes (would be Mrs Alex MacDonald).

In 1915, Rose divorced J.B. Tatolow and married Bert McNeil. They moved to 2nd Avenue.

Rose lived in Britannia for several years around 1921, including the time of the flood. She returned to Squamish after. Rose died on June 3, 1970 at age 86.

Brennan, Patrick Joseph

  • PB01
  • Person
  • August 29, 1918 - February 8, 1979

Pat was the first child born in Woodfibre on August 29, 1918. Pat's father Edward was manager of the mill for Whalen Pulp and Paper Co. He was one of 9 children, the others being: Edward, Jane, Alice, Ruth, Bob, Kirk, Billie, and Colleen.

Pat worked during the boom in Woodfibre and logged at Alta Lake, Powell River, and Lac La Hache. From 1939 to 1945, he served in the U.S. Navy in the Second World War.

In 1946 he returned to Squamish and in July 1949 he married Tess Martin in St Joseph's Church. Father Gallo conducted the ceremony. They lived at the end of Judd Road on land that the Judds originally pre-empted.

In 1951, Pat and his partner John Drenka incorporated Squamish Mills Co. He also spear-headed the fight against Empire Mills' Tree Farm License. In 1956 he became the president of Squamish Mills.

In the 1960's Pat Brennan acquired a 56 acre site where Overwaitea, the medical clinic, and senior citizens home now stands as development land for Squamish.

Brennan died at age 60. He was survived by his wife Tess and children John Patrick, Kathleen Anne, Susan Alice, and Elizabeth Jane. Izzy Boscariol acted as mayor until the elections in November.

Brennan Park was dedicated on May 6, 1979.

In 1980, a public safety building was built. Its creation was largely due to Mayor Brennan.

Jimmy, Jimmy

  • JJ01
  • Person

Jimmy Jimmy (Indian name-Swahsh) and his wife lived quite far up the Squamish river; past Baynes Island and a little farther up past the end of Judd Slough. He claimed that he was chosen to present a gift of Indian baskets on behalf of the Squamish Indians to Prince Edward (who later became King Edward, but abdicated) in the late 1800's. Jimmy Jimmy was very pockmarked from his bout with smallpox.

His wife was quite a character. Wherever she went, she carried her chamber pot with her. Whenever she rode in Mr Judd's "taxi service", he knew he would have to stop and let her out somewhere along the trip.

Account of Chief Jimmy Jimmy from Ta Kaya (Lone Wolf) [I Remember, page 9]: No one knew his age. When asked his age, he always said "seventy snows", meaning seventy years. He must have been nearly a hundred years old when he passed away. When his eyes started to fail, he had to hang up his rifle and use his shotgun loaded with buckshot to get a deer. After a few years, I really felt sorry for Jimmy. He came and told me that his eyes had failed him completely and that he couldn't see a deer more than forty feet so had to quit hunting. A few of us always shared our meat with him. He never had any children of his own to carry on his skills.
[Page 30] He was noted as the best canoe man that we ever had on the Squamish River. He had a large thirty-three foot dugout canoe that he made himself. He charged ten dollars a day for himself and the canoe to carry freight on the river and charged extra for any help he needed. A day then was from daylight until dark.

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