Showing 262 results

Authority record

Mackenzie, Roderick

  • RM02
  • Person
  • January 5, 1868 - April 29, 1957

Roderick Mackenzie was born in Scotland. He was the son of Murdo Mackenzie.

Around 1899, he served with the Highland Regiment in South Africa during the Boer War. He was a close friend of Indian leader, Mahatma Ghandi. He sold goods by ox-cart in anti-British sectors of South Africa.

Roderick married Elizabeth Maclagan and settled in North America in 1908. In 1912, he came to the "boom town" of Squamish and bought a lot on Cleveland Avenue (in the later location of the IGA parking lot) for $2000. On this land he established a men's clothing store in partnership with Bob Fraser. This was the first of his department store chain. When the land boom ended, he purchased the adjoining lot for $50. The store completely burned down in 1917. Roderick purchased the building across the street and started to rebuild on the old store's site.

In 1918, Roderick opened a store in Williams Lake. He would later live in Williams Lake for many years becoming a charter member of the Board Trade, a prominent member of the Masonic Lodge and chairman of the War Memorial Hospital there.

Roderick later bought out Lake's store (located where the IGA would later be) that sold groceries and clothing. He returned to his rebuilt store when the man who owned the Lake's property raised the rent. He added a lean-to to the old store in order to include a grocery department. He later returned to the site of the Lake's store as the owner.

In 1921, his business in Williams Lake burned down. It was later rebuilt.

In 1928, he represented the Cariboo in the Provincial Legislature from 1928 to 1932. He became known as the "Laird of the Cariboo".

His store opened in Wells in the 1930's. During the floods in Squamish, Mackenzies' always provided supplies of ready to eat foods for the town's flood victims. He helped the war effort in 1944 by producing carloads of hogs for export. His ranch was the old Squamish Valley Hop Company ranch.

The Wells store closed in 1951 and Roderick added fifty feet to the store on Cleveland Avenue.

In 1954, Roderick's son, Alistair, took over the Squamish store.

Roderick's wife died in March 1957. Roderick died at 89 years of age on April 29, 1957.

The Mackenzies Shopping Center closed on March 16, 1966. It had been run by Roderick's son, Alistair. The store was later replaced by the IGA.

Magee, Fred Osborne

  • FM01
  • Person
  • March 29, 1876 - November 1, 1960

Fred Magee was born in Point Grey, BC to Hugh (originally from Ireland) and Isabella (nee Crawford, formerly of Scotland). He came to Squamish in 1895 where his brother George was living. He married Ione Smith (born in 1886) and together they had 5 sons (Fred, Cameron, Leslie, David, and Robert) and 4 daughters (Ione Matheson, Edith Magee, Irene Tite, and Hilda Dublack).

From 1900 to 1910 he owned a second house on Main Street. He had a dairy farm where Weldwood Sawmill is now located.

In November 1904 he packed equipment from Squamish to the fish hatchery at Owl Creek. He later herded cattle to railway construction camps from Squamish to Pemberton.

Fred died and was bured in Squamish on November 1, 1960. Ione Maee died at age 87 on October 4, 1974.

Mashiter, William

  • WM01
  • Person
  • June 1, 1850 - January 11, 1938

William Mashiter was born in Woodford County, Cheshire, England and brought up as a farmer. His father was the first Vicar of Woodford.

He left England in May 1870. in 1874 he arrived in Victoria after first travelling to California. He worked in canneries along the Skeena River and took part in the Cassiar Gold Rush. He came to Vancouver via the Lillooet-Squamish tarail and canoed down Howe Sound. He also operated a logging camp on the Fraser River for one and a half years.

William arrived in Granville (now Gastown) in November 1884. He opened a general store in Granville on Water Street. The store burned in the "great fire" on June 13, 1886. By June 16, 1886, he had already rebuilt the store.

Between 1889 to 1890, he rode a sleigh on Marine Drive. He was one of teh two survivors when a tree fell on the sleigh. Four people died.

In 1890, William came up to Squamish and took over the Magee farm. In 1891 he built a store and post office at the foot of Winnipeg Street (present site of the Shell Bulk Plant). It was the only store until 1905. The store had a small dock, "Mashiter's Landing" that was serviced twice weekly by the S.S. Defiance and Saturna. He was the post master until 1903.

William also ran a boat service across the channel to where the Pentecostal Church now stands.

He married Elizabeth Atkinson (from Cumberland, England) in Vancouver on May 21, 1894. In 1902, he sold his business to David Galbraith and went to England for the summer with his wife. During his absence, William Brohm built "Mashiter House". It was a landmark until it was torn down in 1964 to clear the way for Overwaitea (later the location of Fields).

In 1909, school was held in the Mashiter's old store house. In 1915 he donated land and grounds for the first proper school in Squamish (Mashiter School). He remained an official of the School Board for several years.

In September 1925, Mrs Mashiter died at age 78 and was buried in Brackendale. She had been the first president of the Ladies Guild for the Anglican Church.

In the 1930's, he lost most of his property to taxes in the depression. He continued to farm hay until his death.

Memorials: Mashiter Creek, Mashiter School, altar windows and brass plaque in St. John's (memorial to Mrs Mashiter), and a Carved Oak Lecturn (memorial to Mr Mashiter).

McCarthy, Grace

  • GM01
  • Person
  • October 14, 1927 - present

Grace McCarthy served the Province of British Columbia as an elected member of the Legislative Assembly for over 22 years. When she was Deputy Premier of the Province, she was instrumental in bringing the world fair, Expo '86 to Vancouver . As Minister of Tourism, she spearheaded the building of the Vancouver Trade and Convention Centre at Canada Harbour Place.

Serving as Minister of Social Services, Grace established Canada 's first Hot Line to respond to abused children, and brought the most comprehensive legislation to stop child abuse in the country. As Minister of Economic Development, she began the Asia Pacific Initiative and the Enterprise Centre, precursor to the Internet and oversaw the building of Vancouver 's first rapid transit system “The Skytrain.” Grace lobbied successfully for home-ownership for women. Prior to her efforts, a woman could not be considered for a mortgage without a male guarantor.

Her many honours include the Order of Canada, and the Order of British Columbia as well as Honorary Doctor of Laws from Simon Fraser University, and the University of British Columbia, Order of Distinguished Service Worldwide from the Salvation Army, Honorary Fellow, Royal Architectural Institute of Canada, and Variety International's Golden Heart Award.

Grace serves on the Board of Directors of BC Bearing Engineers and appointed to the Council for the Segal Centre for Graduate Management Studies at Simon Fraser University .

McNeil, Rose

  • RM01
  • Person
  • April 9, 1884 - June 3, 1970

Born Rose Emma Wotruba.

In 1907, Rose pre-empted a homestead on the Cheekeye River with husband, J.B. Tatlow and children Clarence (Hank) and Agnes (would be Mrs Alex MacDonald).

In 1915, Rose divorced J.B. Tatolow and married Bert McNeil. They moved to 2nd Avenue.

Rose lived in Britannia for several years around 1921, including the time of the flood. She returned to Squamish after. Rose died on June 3, 1970 at age 86.

Midnight, Charles Sr

  • CM01
  • Person
  • April 1872 - March 5, 1949

Charles was born in Austria but emigrated from Italy. He married Alice Claire Smith, daughter of railway roadmaster Hugh Smith in Massachusetts on August 24, 1904.

Charles Midnight Jr was born in 1907. He would become an engineer on the railway. Charles Midnight Senior had 14 children in total, including Hazel Armstrong.

Charles came to Squamish around 1919 and lived in both Squamish and Cheakamus. He became a section foreman of the PGE in Cheakamus. He changed his surname to Midnight (possibly from Menzanotte).

He died at 77 years of age on March 5, 1949. Mrs A. Midnight died at age 85 on June 25, 1971.

Mills, Catherine (Kate)

  • KM01
  • Person

Kate Robertson married Allen Rae who had come to Canada from Scotland at age 21. They had a son (Oswald) and two daughters (Retta and Minnie). Minnie was born on January 17, 1888. The family left their farm in Manitoba as the wheat froze each winter. They came to Squamish in February 1889 where Kate's parents had alrady pre-empted. Allen hoped to find gold. They pre-empted near the present day railway shops.

Kate and Allen had seven more sons in Squamish: Thomas Edgar was the first white child to be born in the Squamish Valley (March 8, 1889), Wilfred (1891), Robert Stewart (1893), Herbert Lawson (June 15, 1894), Maurice (1896), Lawrence Johnson (1900), and Jimmie (around 1902).

Allen joined the hop industry around 1894. He grew hops in an area now known as North Yards. The farm would be 160 acres and was separated in 1921 when the Mamquam River changed its course. In 1904, Allen sold 20 acres of land to Jimmy Neil.

Allen died when he was blasting stumps on his farm. He did not wait long enough after he thought the fuse had gone out. The house near the railway shops was destroyed by a flood in 1908.

Around 1910, Kate bought a boarding house beside the Bracken Arms for the men working on the Howe Sound Northern Railway. The Lews, and then the Armstrongs were the successive owners.

Kate married Hugh Henry Mills in 1912. They lived in the house where Norm Halvorson later lived in 1984.

Mills, Hugh Henry

  • HM01
  • Person
  • 1886 - November 23, 1951

Hugh came to Squamish in 1891 to build barns for George Magee. He also built the Newport Hotel and several other houses.

He married Catherine (Kate) Rae in 1912 after her husband died. He built a house on the 1984 site of Norm Halvorson's land.

He died at age 85 on November 23, 1951.

The Newport Hotel burned down in 1956. It would later be replaced by the current Chieftain Hotel.

Munro, Henry Alexander

  • AM01
  • Person
  • January 20, 1871 - June 13, 1950

Henry Alexander was born in Quebec to Alexander and Annie (nee Hudson), both of Quebec. He was married to Christina Mcleen Dunlop.

He came to Squamish in 1912 to repair the Newport Hotel. He decided to stay so his wife and 3 sons joined him 3 months later.

Henry Alexander carried on a freighting service, had a livery stable, and a blacksmith shop. He would also make coffins and dig graves. He founded the Squamish Fire Department. Beginning with a bucket brigade and developing it to a $10,000 investment. He was the fire chief right up until he retired a few months before his death. He also advocated for parks in Squamish.

In the 1920's, he logged at Birken. Then he returned to Squamish to frieght material for the Utopia Mine at Britannia by packhorse (Dray Business). In 1934, he was in the dray business for the Asloo Mines. He later began a packhorse service into Black Tusk Meadows of Garibaldi Park.

After his wife died, one of his sons, Alexander ("Young Alex"), died when a locomotive #53 plunged into Seton Lake on january 23, 1950. After he retired as a Fire Chief he was awarded a Good Citizenship medal in March 1950.

He died on June 15, 1950 at age 81.

Neil, James Mathew

  • JN01
  • Person
  • September 4, 1873 - December 6, 1953

James Neil was born in Ontario. His father was Mathew Neil.

In 1900, he married Jean Matheson. Before coming to Squamish in 1907, he worked for many logging companies. In Squamish, he worked as a donkey "puncher".

He had a son named James Douglas.

In 1914, he logged with Earl Judd. Together they hauled a steam donkey on the Squamish River (2 miles above Pemberton).

He died at age 80 on December 6, 1953.

Paddy, George

  • GP01
  • Person

George arrived in Squamish Valley around 1894. He married William Mashiter's niece, Thursa.

In 1907, Howe Sound Pemberton Valley Northern Railway bought his 42 acre island.

Philip, Myrtle

  • MP01
  • Person
  • 1891 - 1986

Myrtle Philip is Whistler Valley’s most significant female pioneer. Born in the Eastern United States in 1891, Myrtle migrated to the west coast of British Columbia in her early twenties with her husband Alex Philip.

The couple fell in love with British Columbia’s Coast Mountains and decided to carry out their dream of building a holiday retreat. With the guidance of an old trapper, the Philips travelled north of Vancouver up the Pemberton Trail to a place called Alta Lake. Adventurous hiking, fishing, and fresh mountain air soon made the Lodge the most popular resort destination west of the Rocky Mountains. Guests participated in a number of outdoor activities such as horseback riding, swimming, boating, hunting, skiing and skating.

Rae, Allen

  • AR01
  • Person

Allen Rae came from Scotland at age 21. He married Kate Robertson and they had a son (Oswald) and two daughters (Retta and Minnie). Minnie was born on January 17, 1888. The family left their farm in Manitoba as the wheat froze each winter. They came to Squamish in February 1889 where Kate's parents had alrady pre-empted. Allen hoped to find gold. They pre-empted near the present day railway shops.

Allen and Kate had seven more sons in Squamish: Thomas Edgar was the first white child to be born in the Squamish Valley (March 8, 1889), Wilfred (1891), Robert Stewart (1893), Herbert Lawson (June 15, 1894), Maurice (1896), Lawrence Johnson (1900), and Jimmie (around 1902).

Allen joined the hop industry around 1894. He grew hops in an area now known as North Yards. The farm would be 160 acres and was separated in 1921 when the Mamquam River changed its course.

In 1904, Allen sold 20 acres of land to Jimmy Neil.

Allen died when he was blasting stumps on his farm. He did not wait long enough after he thought the fuse had gone out.

The house near the railway shops was destroyed by a flood in 1908.

Memorial: Rae Creek.

Rae, Herbert Lawson

  • LR01
  • Person
  • June 15, 1894 - December 17, 1958

Herbert Lawson was born in the North Yards area of Squamish to Allen and Kate Rae. He was a student in the first school. Around 1819, he joined the army and was assigned to Siberia. He later married Clara Lillian Nicholls, a teacher and the neice of Emily Carr. Clara was born on March 7, 1891 in England to Richard Nicholls and Clara Carr. They would have 6 children. The five that were alive in 1983 were Louise Riis, Herbert, Donny, David, and Betty Lorenz.

In the 1920's, Lawson was Government Road foreman when the road to Britannia was built. At one time he was Public Works Foreman. He was also a Dairy Farmer.

When Lawson died in December 1958, he had the only farm in active use in the Squamish Valley. His wife Clara died in 1976

Rae, Jessica (Jessie)

  • JR01
  • Person
  • November 23, 1903 -

Jessie Judd was born to Henry and Barbara Anne (nee Edwards) Judd. She married Robert Stewart (Bert) Rae on December 27, 1927 and had three kids with him: Stewart James (Jimmy) on June 5, 1929; Catherine Anne (Anne - Mrs D.W. Davidson) on September 15, 1933; and Harry Stewart on January 27, 1935. Her husband was in a car accident at the entrance to Squamish in 1977. He died of complications as a result at age 86 on April 14, 1978. Her son Harry died in 1981.

Rae, Jimmie

  • JR01
  • Person
  • ~1902 - 1981

Jimmie was born the youngest of 10 Rae children. He married Grace Braiathwaite and he died in 1981.

Rae, Lawrence Johnson

  • LR01
  • Person
  • 1900 - February 8, 1961

Lawrence Johnson was born in Squamish to Kate and Allen Rae. He married Violet Jane Smith on September 19, 1921. Violet died on July 28, 1924. Lawrence died in Quesnel at age 61.

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